Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Our History
Inducted

A committee of interested golfers from around the state formed the Georgia State Golf Association in 1916 following the first Georgia Amateur Championship. According to early records, the primary purpose of founding the Association was to conduct a state amateur championship. A 14-year-old Atlantan named Bobby Jones captured that first Georgia Amateur at Capital City Club in Atlanta. The GSGA was incorporated in 1924 and was managed solely by volunteers over the next five decades. Among its milestones, the GSGA began supporting turfgrass research in 1959, rating courses in 1961, added the Junior Championship in 1966 and began administering the handicap system in 1972 before adding its first full-time staff director in 1973. The following decades saw extensive growth in members, volunteers, staff and services as the GSGA expanded its competitions program to include 18 statewide events and four interstate matches, computerized the handicap system, formalized the course rating program, established a charitable foundation, started publishing Golf Georgia magazine and began managing the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

P. Dan Yates, Jr. - Class of 1996 - Passes Away
Inducted

The Georgia Golf Hall of Fame is saddened to report the passing of P. Dan Yates, Jr., GGHOF Class of 1996.
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Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Tom Forkner - Class of 2007 - Passes Away
Inducted

The Georgia Golf Hall of Fame is saddened to report the passing of Tom Forkner, GGHOF Class of 2007.
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Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

GGHOF Announces Class of 2018!
Inducted

The Georgia State Golf Association is proud to announce the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame's Class of 2018 - Stephen Hamblin, Martha Stacy Leach, Sonny Skinner and Wright Waddell.
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Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

GGHOF Announces Class of 2018!
Inducted

MARIETTA, Ga. - The Georgia State Golf Association is pleased to announce the 2018 inductees into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame:

Stephen Hamblin, Alpharetta, Ga., is the longtime executive director of the American Junior Golf Association and has dedicated more than three decades to the overall growth and development of junior golf;

Martha Stacy Leach, Hebron, Ky., is a USGA national champion and former University of Georgia standout who has competed at the highest level from junior golf through the present;

Sonny Skinner, Sylvester, Ga., is a PGA Teaching Professional and has enjoyed a successful career on the state and national competitive circuits;

Wright Waddell, Columbus, Ga., is a lifelong amateur golfer winning on nearly every level and has devoted many years to giving back to the game

The Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Induction Banquet and Ceremony will take place on Saturday, January 20, 2018, at the Atlanta Athletic Club in Johns Creek.

The Atlanta Athletic Club holds a long and storied place in the history of golf in the state of Georgia, as the home club of the greatest amateur golfer of them all, Bobby Jones, along with no less than 14 other members of the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame. The club hosted its third PGA Championship in 2011, and most recently hosted the U.S. Amateur Championship, its sixth USGA national championship, in 2014.

Dave Ballard, chairman of the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Committee, said, "The Hall of Fame Committee of volunteers devoted time and resources to thoroughly vetting the nominations for the Hall of Fame, and we are thrilled to announce the Class of 2018 who will be inducted into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame. I appreciate all the committee members in selecting this terrific class and we look forward to celebrating the accomplishments of these worthy individuals."

Biographical information on the four inductees:


Stephen Hamblin, Alpharetta, Ga.Stephen Hamblin of Alpharetta, Ga., is the longtime executive director of the American Junior Golf Association and has dedicated more than three decades to the overall growth and development of junior golf. Born in Michigan in 1955, Hamblin attended Michigan State University and earned a degree in Landscape Architecture in 1980. He served as the resident golf professional at the Copperhead Course at Innisbrook Resort and Golf Club in Palm Harbor, Fla., from 1980 to 1983. Hamblin then moved to Georgia to join the American Junior Golf Association - the nonprofit organization dedicated to the overall growth and development of young men and women who aspire to earn college golf scholarships through competitive junior golf. He has served as the executive director since 1984. Under his guidance, the association has grown from 17 tournaments and 1,500 members in 1984 to more than 100 tournaments and more than 6,500 members today. One of the many milestone achievements of his tenure was the implementation of the ACE Grant, which provides financial assistance to young men and women through college scholarships. Due to his leadership and the ability of his staff, Hamblin's former staff can be seen throughout the golf industry. Each year the AJGA helps nearly 90 interns launch their careers through administering events nationwide or working at national headquarters located in Braselton, Ga. Hamblin serves on the executive committee of Golf 20/20, the World Golf Foundation initiative to grow the game. Hamblin currently resides in Alpharetta, Ga., with his wife, Carol, and has four daughters and one son. Away from promoting junior golf on a worldwide scale, Hamblin is an avid fly fisherman.
Martha Stacy Leach, Hebron, Ky.Martha Leach of Hebron, Ky., is a USGA national champion and former University of Georgia standout, who has competed at the highest level from junior golf through the present. Born in Savannah, Ga., in 1962, Leach attended St. Vincent's Academy. As a junior golfer, she earned First Team All-American honors on the American Junior Golf Association (AJGA) and competed in numerous events on the Georgia State Golf Association circuit, winning the 1978 Georgia Girls' Championship and advanced to the quarterfinals of the U.S. Girls' Junior Championship that same year. Leach attended and played golf at the University of Georgia and earned a letter in 1980, 1981, 1982 and 1983. In her senior season, she helped her team win the Southeastern Conference (SEC) Championship and finished third at the NCAA Championship in 1983. She earned All-SEC Conference recognition that year as well. In 1991, Leach began an impressive run of success on the national circuit beginning with the U.S. Women's Amateur Championship, where she advanced to the semifinals. She would go on to qualify for and compete in three other U.S. Women's Amateurs in 1995, 1996 and 2014. She has qualified for 10 U.S. Women's Mid-Amateur Championships (1992, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2009, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016), winning the 2009 event at Golden Hills Golf and Turf Club in Ocala, Fla., over 2013 Georgia Golf Hall of Fame inductee and UGA teammate Laura Coble of Augusta, Ga. Most recently as a senior golfer, Leach has qualified for the last three U.S. Senior Women's Amateur Championships (2016, 2015, 2014). Over the course of her amateur career, she has competed in more than 60 USGA championships. Leach's sister, Hollis Stacy, was inducted into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame in 1991 and the World Golf Hall of Fame in 2012. In 1985, the Stacy family was named the 'Golf Family of the Year' by the USGA.
Sonny Skinner, Sylvester, Ga.Sonny Skinner of Sylvester, Ga., is a PGA Teaching Professional and has enjoyed a successful career on the state and national competitive circuits. Born in Portsmouth, Va., in 1960, Skinner attended Worth County High School in Sylvester, Ga. He was a standout on the golf team and on the football field during his high school years. Skinner attended both Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College in Tifton, Ga., (1978-80) and Shorter College in Rome, Ga., (1980-82), competing on the golf team at both and winning six collegiate events. Skinner turned professional in 1982. He went to work as an assistant professional at Valdosta Country Club in 1982 and 1983, and then served as head professional at Pine Knoll Country Club from 1984 to 1989. He joined the PGA TOUR in 1990 and then began a successful professional playing career. He won twice on the developmental circuit, including the 1993 Nike Shreveport Open and the 1994 Nike Dominion Open. In 2001, he won his first event on the Georgia Section of the PGA schedule at the Griffin Classic. Skinner was the first player in the history of the PGA of America to earn both the PGA Professional Player of the Year (2008) and the Senior PGA Professional Player of the Year (2010, 2011, 2012). Skinner finished as low club professional at the 2011 Senior PGA Championship. A winner of several competitions administered by the Georgia PGA Section, Skinner has received Georgia PGA Player of the Year and Georgia PGA Senior Player of the Year honors as well multiple times. Currently, Skinner serves as a teaching professional at River Poine Golf Club in Albany, Ga.
Wright Waddell, Columbus, Ga.Wright Waddell of Columbus, Ga., is a lifelong amateur golfer winning on nearly every level and has devoted many years to giving back to the game of golf. Born in Columbus, Ga., in 1962, Waddell attended Hardaway High School and later the University of Georgia. He was a member of two Southeastern Conference (SEC) Championship teams (1982, 1983), and competed in four NCAA Championships during his time in Athens. For his efforts, Waddell was an All-SEC selection three times, including an All-American selection in 1983. He served as team captain in 1984 before earning a degree in Finance. Waddell is a four-time winner of the Southeastern Amateur Championship (1989, 1994, 1996, 2000), and earned runner-up honors four additional times. On the GSGA circuit, Waddell won the Georgia Mid-Amateur Championship twice (1990, 1999) and was a two-time runner-up in the Georgia Amateur Championship. Four times he won the Georgia Four-Ball Championship (1991, 1995, 2003, 2004) with partner Carter Mize of Columbus, Ga., who himself was inducted into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame in 2015. In national competition, Waddell has qualified for and competed in 15 USGA championships - seven U.S. Amateurs, seven U.S. Mid-Amateurs and one U.S. Junior Amateur. His best finish was an appearance in the semifinals of the 2004 U.S. Mid-Amateur when it was held in his home state at Sea Island Golf Club. He has won the club championship eight times at Green Island Country Club in Columbus and once at the Country Club of Columbus. Away from the golf course, Waddell has given back to the game by serving on the Board of Directors of the First Tee of Columbus, American Cancer Society and the Columbus YMCA. His father-in-law, Gunby Jordan, was inducted into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame in 1994.
The Class of 2018 was selected by the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Committee and approved by the GSGA Executive Committee. These four inductees will bring the total number of Georgia Golf Hall of Fame members to 115.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Arnold Blum - Class of 1989 - Passes Away
Inducted

The Georgia Golf Hall of Fame is saddened to report the passing of Arnold Blum, GGHOF Class of 1989.
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Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Class of 2017 Inducted into Georgia Golf HOF
Inducted

The Class of 2017 was officially inducted into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame on Saturday, January 21, at Atlanta Athletic Club in Johns Creek. Congratulations Jeff Knox, Jim Stamps, Sr., Stewart Cink and Joe Inman, Jr.


Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

2017 Inductee Video Documentaries
Inducted

Produced by Rajat Agarwal

Click the following links to view each inductees' video:

Jeff Knox

Jim Stamps, Sr.

Stewart Cink

Joe Inman, Jr.

 


Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Joe Inman, Jr.
Inducted 2017

Joseph Cooper (Joe) Inman, Jr., of Marietta, Ga., is the Head Coach of the Georgia State University men's golf program and a longtime professional golfer with success on the PGA and Champions Tours.

Born in Indianapolis, Ind., in 1947, Inman attended high school in Greensboro, N.C., and then played golf at Wake Forest University from 1965 to 1970. As a collegiate golfer, Inman was a three-time All-America selection, including first-team honors in 1969. Playing under the leadership of head coach Jesse Haddock, Inman helped his team win three-consecutive Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) titles and top-three finishes at the NCAA Championships in 1968 and 1969. 

After graduating with a degree in History, Inman turned professional in 1972. He won four times as a professional - once on the PGA TOUR and three times on the Champions Tour. He won the 1976 Kemper Open on the PGA TOUR, and on the Champions Tour, he won the Pacific Bell Open in 1988 and 1999, and the SBC Open in 2000. He had nearly 100 top-25 finishes on each circuit and earned over $5 million. 

Inman currently serves as the head coach of the men's golf team at Georgia State University in Atlanta, where he has raised the level of success expected by the program. In his first year, Inman led the Panthers to the NCAA Regionals in 2009. During the 2013-14 season, he guided his squad to a school-record four wins, a second-place finish at the NCAA Regionals and a ranking of 43rd in the country. 

Inman is active in the community, serving on the Board of Directors of the First Tee of Atlanta, and founded the Larry Nelson-Joe Inman Foundation, which supports youth golf initiatives. Inman and his wife, Nancy, reside in Marietta, Ga., and have three children - Craig, Sally and Kate.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Stewart Cink
Inducted 2017

Stewart E. Cink of Duluth, Ga., was a standout of the Georgia Tech golf program and is a major champion on the PGA TOUR who has brought honor to the game both as an amateur and professional.

Born in Huntsville, Ala., Cink attended Bradshaw High School in Huntsville. He moved to Atlanta and played golf at Georgia Tech from 1992 to 1995. He was an All-American in 1993, 1994 and 1995, and was an All-Atlantic Coast Conference (SCC) selection those years as well. Cink was named ACC Player of the Year in 1995 and was on its academic honor roll in 1992 and 1993. 

Cink played in 38 team events while at Georgia Tech with a career stroke average of 72.47. He was the recipient of the Fred Haskins Award in 1995, given to the most outstanding collegiate golfer in NCAA Division I, and the Jack Nicklaus Player of the Year award. He was inducted into the Georgia Tech Athletic Hall of Fame in 2005.

After a successful collegiate and amateur career, Cink turned professional in 1995. He is enjoying a professional career that includes six PGA TOUR victories, highlighted most recently by The Open Championship in 2009 at Turnberry Resort in Scotland. He also won the 2008 Travelers Championship, 2004 MCI Heritage, 2004 World Golf Championship-NEC Invitational, 2000 MCI Heritage and the 1997 Canon Greater Hartford Open. He was named PGA TOUR Rookie of the Year in 1997.

In international competition, Cink was selected to the United States Ryder Cup team five times (2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010) and the President's Cup four times (2000, 2005, 2007, 2009). 

He founded Cink Charities in 2011, and the Cink It Challenge was developed to raise funds for two Atlanta area charities. Cink and his wike, Lisa, reside in Duluth, Ga., and have two sons - Connor and Reagan.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

James W. Stamps, Sr.
Inducted 2017

James W. (Jim) Stamps was a head golf professional and teacher of the game in Georgia with a distinguished playing career as an amateur and professional.

Stamps was born in Coweta County, Ga., in 1921 and attended high school in College Park. Raised by his mother and older sisters, he picked up the game of golf by caddying at a local course in College Park.

Stamps served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II. After serving and earning the rank of Sergeant, he was honorably discharged and continued his amateur golf career.

Stamps became the assistant golf professional at Fairyland Golf Club in Tennessee, then thereafter moved back to Georgia and became the head golf professional at Dalton Golf and Country Club in 1956. During his time in Dalton, he was recognized as one of Georgia's best golfers by his peers and he developed a strong junior program, where he taught hundreds of juniors the game. 

As a competitive player, Stamps was the winner of many tournaments in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s as both an amateur and professional. He won the Georgia Open in 1958 and 1962, and the Georgia PGA Championship in 1961 and 1965. Stamps also won the PGA National Club Professional Championship in 1962.

Stamps passed away in March of 2011.

 

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Jeff Knox
Inducted 2017

Jefferson B.A. (Jeff) Knox of Augusta, Ga., is an accomplished lifelong amateur golfer on the state and national levels and has made an impact in the community on and off the golf course. 

Born in Thomson, Ga., Knox attended Thomson High School, and later the University of Georgia, earning a degree in Finance in 1984. 

Knox has played in several competitions sanctioned by the Georgia State Golf Association, and still currently competes at a high level. He won the Georgia Mid-Amateur Championship in 2008 at Cuscowilla on Lake Oconee in Eatonton, and a year later in 2009 at White Columns Country Club in Alpharetta. He finished runner-up at the Georgia Mid-Amateur four times (2001, 2003, 2004, 2005). In the Georgia Amateur Championship, Knox earned runner-up honors in 1998, 2006 and 2007. 

He has won the Azalea Amateur Championship, the Peach Blossom Invitational and is a two-time Charlie Coe champion. 

On the national circuit, Knox has qualified for and competed in several national championships conducted by the United States Golf Association. He has played in seven U.S. Mid-Amateur Championships and two U.S. Amateur Championships. Knox was also chosen to represent Georgia at the USGA Men's State Team Championship four times.

He oversees the Knox Foundation, which was started with the purpose of giving back to a charitable organization and building up supportive funds for non-profit groups in the Augusta community. 

Knox is a board member of the University of Georgia Foundation as well as the First Bank of Georgia. 

Knox and his wife, Catherine, reside in Augusta, Ga., and have three sons - Jefferson, Lee and Austin.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Tickets Now On Sale for the 2017 Banquet!
Inducted

Tickets are now on sale for the 2017 Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Induction Banquet! Join us in welcoming the Class of 2017 - Stewart Cink, Joe Inman, Jeff Knox and Jim Stamps (posthumously) on Saturday, January 21, at Atlanta Athletic Club!
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Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Bob Cupp - Class of 2014 - Passes Away
Inducted

The Georgia Golf Hall of Fame is saddened to report the passing of Bob Cupp, GGHOF Class of 2014.
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Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

GGHOF Announces Class of 2017!
Inducted

The Georgia State Golf Association is proud to announce the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame's Class of 2017 - Stewart E. Cink, Joseph Cooper (Joe) Inman, Jr., Jefferson B. A. (Jeff) Knox and James W. (Jim) Stamps (posthumous induction).
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Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

GGHOF Announces Class of 2018!
Inducted

MARIETTA, Ga. - The Georgia State Golf Association is pleased to announce the 2018 inductees into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame:

Stephen Hamblin, Alpharetta, Ga., is the longtime executive director of the American Junior Golf Association and has dedicated more than three decades to the overall growth and development of junior golf;

Martha Stacy Leach, Hebron, Ky., is a USGA national champion and former University of Georgia standout who has competed at the highest level from junior golf through the present;

Sonny Skinner, Sylvester, Ga., is a PGA Teaching Professional and has enjoyed a successful career on the state and national competitive circuits;

Wright Waddell, Columbus, Ga., is a lifelong amateur golfer winning on nearly every level and has devoted many years to giving back to the game

The Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Induction Banquet and Ceremony will take place on Saturday, January 20, 2018, at the Atlanta Athletic Club in Johns Creek. 

The Atlanta Athletic Club holds a long and storied place in the history of golf in the state of Georgia, as the home club of the greatest amateur golfer of them all, Bobby Jones, along with no less than 14 other members of the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame. The club hosted its third PGA Championship in 2011, and most recently hosted the U.S. Amateur Championship, its sixth USGA national championship, in 2014. 

Dave Ballard, chairman of the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Committee, said, "The Hall of Fame Committee of volunteers devoted time and resources to thoroughly vetting the nominations for the Hall of Fame, and we are thrilled to announce the Class of 2018 who will be inducted into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame. I appreciate all the committee members in selecting this terrific class and we look forward to celebrating the accomplishments of these worthy individuals." 

Biographical information on the four inductees:

Stephen Hamblin, Alpharetta, Ga.
Stephen Hamblin of Alpharetta, Ga., is the longtime executive director of the American Junior Golf Association and has dedicated more than three decades to the overall growth and development of junior golf.     

Born in Michigan in 1955, Hamblin attended Michigan State University and earned a degree in Landscape Architecture in 1980. He served as the resident golf professional at the Copperhead Course at Innisbrook Resort and Golf Club in Palm Harbor, Fla., from 1980 to 1983.     

Hamblin then moved to Georgia to join the American Junior Golf Association - the nonprofit organization dedicated to the overall growth and development of young men and women who aspire to earn college golf scholarships through competitive junior golf. He has served as the executive director since 1984.     

Under his guidance, the association has grown from 17 tournaments and 1,500 members in 1984 to more than 100 tournaments and more than 6,500 members today. One of the many milestone achievements of his tenure was the implementation of the ACE Grant, which provides financial assistance to young men and women through college scholarships.      

Due to his leadership and the ability of his staff, Hamblin's former staff can be seen throughout the golf industry. Each year the AJGA helps nearly 90 interns launch their careers through administering events nationwide or working at national headquarters located in Braselton, Ga.     

Hamblin serves on the executive committee of Golf 20/20, the World Golf Foundation initiative to grow the game.         

Hamblin currently resides in Alpharetta, Ga., with his wife, Carol, and has four daughters and one son. Away from promoting junior golf on a worldwide scale, Hamblin is an avid fly fisherman.

Martha Stacy Leach, Hebron, Ky.
Martha Leach of Hebron, Ky., is a USGA national champion and former University of Georgia standout, who has competed at the highest level from junior golf through the present.      

Born in Savannah, Ga., in 1962, Leach attended St. Vincent's Academy. As a junior golfer, she earned First Team All-American honors on the American Junior Golf Association (AJGA) and competed in numerous events on the Georgia State Golf Association circuit, winning the 1978 Georgia Girls' Championship and advanced to the quarterfinals of the U.S. Girls' Junior Championship that same year.    

Leach attended and played golf at the University of Georgia and earned a letter in 1980, 1981, 1982 and 1983. In her senior season, she helped her team win the Southeastern Conference (SEC) Championship and finished third at the NCAA Championship in 1983. She earned All-SEC Conference recognition that year as well.      

In 1991, Leach began an impressive run of success on the national circuit beginning with the U.S. Women's Amateur Championship, where she advanced to the semifinals. She would go on to qualify for and compete in three other U.S. Women's Amateurs in 1995, 1996 and 2014. She has qualified for 10 U.S. Women's Mid-Amateur Championships (1992, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2009, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016), winning the 2009 event at Golden Hills Golf and Turf Club in Ocala, Fla., over 2013 Georgia Golf Hall of Fame inductee and UGA teammate Laura Coble of Augusta, Ga.      

Most recently as a senior golfer, Leach has qualified for the last three U.S. Senior Women's Amateur Championships (2016, 2015, 2014). Over the course of her amateur career, she has competed in more than 60 USGA championships.    

Leach's sister, Hollis Stacy, was inducted into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame in 1991 and the World Golf Hall of Fame in 2012. In 1985, the Stacy family was named the 'Golf Family of the Year' by the USGA.

Sonny Skinner, Sylvester, Ga.
Sonny Skinner of Sylvester, Ga., is a PGA Teaching Professional and has enjoyed a successful career on the state and national competitive circuits.      

Born in Portsmouth, Va., in 1960, Skinner attended Worth County High School in Sylvester, Ga. He was a standout on the golf team and on the football field during his high school years. Skinner attended both Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College in Tifton, Ga., (1978-80) and Shorter College in Rome, Ga., (1980-82), competing on the golf team at both and winning six collegiate events.      

Skinner turned professional in 1982. He went to work as an assistant professional at Valdosta Country Club in 1982 and 1983, and then served as head professional at Pine Knoll Country Club from 1984 to 1989. He joined the PGA TOUR in 1990 and then began a successful professional playing career.     

He won twice on the developmental circuit, including the 1993 Nike Shreveport Open and the 1994 Nike Dominion Open. In 2001, he won his first event on the Georgia Section of the PGA schedule at the Griffin Classic.      

Skinner was the first player in the history of the PGA of America to earn both the PGA Professional Player of the Year (2008) and the Senior PGA Professional Player of the Year (2010, 2011, 2012). Skinner finished as low club professional at the 2011 Senior PGA Championship.     

A winner of several competitions administered by the Georgia PGA Section, Skinner has received Georgia PGA Player of the Year and Georgia PGA Senior Player of the Year honors as well multiple times.       

Currently, Skinner serves as a teaching professional at Spring Hill Country Club in Tifton, Ga.

Wright Waddell, Columbus, Ga.
Wright Waddell of Columbus, Ga., is a lifelong amateur golfer winning on nearly every level and has devoted many years to giving back to the game of golf.     

Born in Columbus, Ga., in 1962, Waddell attended Hardaway High School and later the University of Georgia. He was a member of two Southeastern Conference (SEC) Championship teams (1982, 1983), and competed in four NCAA Championships during his time in Athens. For his efforts, Waddell was an All-SEC selection three times, including an All-American selection in 1983. He served as team captain in 1984 before earning a degree in Finance.     

Waddell is a four-time winner of the Southeastern Amateur Championship (1989, 1994, 1996, 2000), and earned runner-up honors four additional times. On the GSGA circuit, Waddell won the Georgia Mid-Amateur Championship twice (1990, 1999) and was a two-time runner-up in the Georgia Amateur Championship. Four times he won the Georgia Four-Ball Championship (1991, 1995, 2003, 2004) with partner Carter Mize of Columbus, Ga., who himself was inducted into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame in 2015.     

In national competition, Waddell has qualified for and competed in 15 USGA championships - seven U.S. Amateurs, seven U.S. Mid-Amateurs and one U.S. Junior Amateur. His best finish was an appearance in the semifinals of the 2004 U.S. Mid-Amateur when it was held in his home state at Sea Island Golf Club. He has won the club championship eight times at Green Island Country Club in Columbus and once at the Country Club of Columbus.   

Away from the golf course, Waddell has given back to the game by serving on the Board of Directors of the First Tee of Columbus, American Cancer Society and the Columbus YMCA. His father-in-law, Gunby Jordan, was inducted into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame in 1994.

The Class of 2018 was selected by the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Committee and approved by the GSGA Executive Committee. These four inductees will bring the total number of Georgia Golf Hall of Fame members to 115.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Georgia Golf Hall of Famers at the #GSGA4BallC!
Inducted

Five members of the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame were on hand at Glen Arven Country Club in Thomasville for the Georgia Four-Ball Championship! (l-r): Layne Williams (2016), Carter Mize (2015), Peter Persons (2011), Pete Cox (1992), Wendell Couch (2007).
Click here for competition results


Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Jack B. Key, Jr. - Class of 1997 - Passes Away
Inducted

The Georgia Golf Hall of Fame is saddened to report the passing of Jack B. Key, Jr., GGHOF Class of 1997.
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Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

2016 Inductee Video Documentaries
Inducted

Produced by Mike Tank

Click the following links to view each inductees' video:

Nanci Bowen

Chris Haack

Stewart "Kiltie" Maiden



James Mason

C. Layne Williams

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Chris Haack
Inducted 2016

Christopher Jay (Chris) Haack of Bogart, Ga., is the Head Coach and Director of Golf at the University of Georgia and his outstanding leadership and dedication has annually made his program a mainstay toward the top of the collegiate golf landscape. He was the first golf coach to be inducted into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame.

Born in Menasha, Wis., Haack moved to Georgia and attended Newnan High School. He played golf at West Georgia College from 197801981, and earned his Bachelor of Arts degree from Mellen University in 1997. He began his career in golf with the American Junior Golf Association, and from 1980-1996, he held multiple positions including Tournament Director, Director of Operations, Director of Development, Foundation Director and Assistant Executive Director.

Haack was named head golf coach at the University of Georgia in 1996 and has taken the program to a new level of success. He has guided the Bulldogs to two national championships (the only two in school history), seven Southeastern Conference (SEC) titles and several team and individual records. His first Georgia squad in the 1997-1997 season showed glimpses of what was to come as he led the team to finish fourth or better in seven of 11 competitions and advanced to the regionals of the NCAA Championship. Haack's breakthrough year came in 1998-1999 when his Bulldog team ascended to a number one ranking in multiple national polls, and later validated the ranking by winning the program's first national championship. Haack was named National Coach of the Year that season.

Under Haack, the Bulldogs have had eight top-10 and 14 top-20 finishes at NCAA Championships, including the 1999 and 2005 national title and runner-up honors in 2007 and 2011. He has developed 54 All-America selections during his tenure, including at least one in 16 of the past 17 seasons.

Haack is a two-time National Coach of the Year (1999 and 2005), four-time SEC Coach of the Year (1998, 2000, 2006, 2010) and was inducted into the Golf Coaches Association of America Hall of Fame in 2012. 

Haack has two children, son Charlie and daughter Kate, and currently resides in Bogart, Ga.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

James Mason
Inducted 2016

James Mason of Dillard, Ga., has enjoyed a successful career as a professional golfer and has made noteworthy contributions to the game.

Mason was born in Gwinnett County, Ga., and attended Duluth High School. He would then walk on to the Auburn University golf team, where he became a four-year letterman. In 1972, he won the Atlanta Amateur Championship (now the Atlanta Amateur Match Play Championship) held at Atlanta Athletic Club in Johns Creek, which began in 1919 as a stroke play competition for amateur golfers in the Atlanta area. 

After his amateur career at Auburn University, Maosn went to work at Sky Valley Country Club in Sky Valley, Ga., where he would hold various positions of Owner, Manager and PGA Golf Professional from 1975-1991.

As a professional golfer, Mason was, and still is, a fixture in Georgia PGA competitions. He won the Georgia Section PGA Team Championship (with Randy Brooks) in 1995. He earned Georgia PGA Player of the Year recognition in 1997, 1998 and 2000, and was Georgia PGA champion in 1997, 1999 and 2000. Also in 1997, Masonwon the Polo Classic Golf Championship and qualified for and competed in the PGA Championship held at Winged Foot Country Club in Mamaroneck, New York. He won the Atlanta Open in 2000.

As a senior golfer, the PGA life-member was the Georgia PGA senior champion in 2001 and again in 2015. On the Champions Tour, he won the NFL Golf Classic in 2002. In total, Mason has competed in nearly 200 Champions Tour events and has earned more than $3 million in career earnings.

Mason and his wife currently reside in Dillard, Ga.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Stewart “Kiltie” Maiden
Inducted 2016

Stewart "Kiltie" Maiden was well-known for his teahcing and club building and has been recognized for his expertise of the golf swing.

Maiden was born in Angus (Carnoustie), Scotland, in 1886. Following his brothers, he came to the United States, specifically to be the golf professional at the East Lake facility, in 1908. He spent nearly 40 years in America, mostly in Georgia, prior to his death in 1948.

Among the many golfing legends who Maiden taught during his career include the great Bobby Jones, Alexa Stirling, Perry Adair, Watts Gunn and Charlie Yates, all members of the Georgia State Golf Association.

Maiden's most-famous pupil, Bobby Jones, once said, "The best luck I ever had in golf was when Stewart Maiden came from Carnoustie, Scotland, to be the professional at East Lake."

Though his accomplishments and career in the golf industry began well over 100 years ago, his students and all the individuals he impacted will be forever embedded in Georgia golf history.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

C. Layne Williams
Inducted 2016

C. Layne Williams of Marietta, Ga., is the longtime Senior Director of Rules and Competitions at the Georgia State Golf Association. His knowledge and passion of the Rules of Golf and experience as a golf administrator has made an impact on the state, national and international level. 

Williams was born in Atlanta and attended Moultrie High School in Moultrie, Ga., where he played golf. He joined the golf team at LaGrange College in 1972 and was the number one player for three years. He was won the club championship at both Highland Country Club in LaGrange and at Raintree Country Club in Charlotte, N.C.

Williams joined the Georgia State Golf Association in 1987 as a tournament director, and quickly elevated to the position of senior director, where he continues to serve today. Having been a Certified Rules Official for the United States Golf Association since 1989, he has acted as Official in Charge at over 250 GSGA competitions and over 250 qualifying rounds for USGA national championships. 

On the national level, Williams has served on the Rules Committee of close to 60 USGA Championships, including several U.S. Open Championships (14), U.S. Amateur Championships (2), U.S. Mid-Amateur Championships (18), and many others. He has conducted GSGA/Georgia PGA Rules of Golf Workshops every year since 1988, and has hosted more than 120 Rules of Golf Seminars at various GSGA Member Clubs, including two seminars for the Bermuda PGA.

In addition to his unquestionable rules knowledge, Williams is an esteemed writer as he has published many articles for various publications, including Golf Georgia magazine and Through the Green magazine. He won the 2001 GAMMA Award for Best Essay for an article he submitted in Golf Georgia.

Williams and his wife, Teresa, currently reside in Marietta, Ga.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Nanci Bowen
Inducted 2016

Nanci Bowen of Travelers Rest, S.C., is a former touring player and major champion on the Ladies Professional Golf Association, and is currently teaching the game in Greenville, S.C. As a seasoned golf professional, she brings valuable experience and wisdom tothe students she teaches.

Born in Tifton, Ga., Bowen attended Tift County High School. As a junior golfer, she competed in many competitions administered by the Georgia State Golf Association, winning four consecutive Georgia Girls' Championships along the way. Now in its 37th year, Bowen won the second Girls' Championship played in 1981 at Coosa Country Club in Rome. She then added titles in 1982 (Country Club of Columbus), 1983 (Snapfinger Woods Country Club in Decatur) and 1984 (Houston Lake Country Club in Perry).

Bowen was awarded a full golf scholarship to the University of Georgia, where she was a two-time All-America selection, In 1987, Bowen earned individual runner-up honors at the Southeastern Conference (SEC) Championship, and in 1989, finished sixth at the NCAA Championship. 

During her collegiate career as an amateur golfer, Bowen was a semifinalist at the 1987 U.S. Women's Amateur Championship played at Rhode Island Country Club in Barrington, Rhode Island. Also as an amateur, she qualified for and competed in four U.S. Women's Open Championships. She was the winner of the 1988 Trans-National Championship.

Bowen turned professional and joined the LPGA Tour in 1990. She captured her first professional victory at the Nabisco Dinah Shore in 1995, one of the LPGA's major championships. In 2002, she crossed the $1 million mark in career earnings. She was a member of the LPGA Tour Player Executive Committee from 1999-2001, and served as its vice president in 2001.

Past initiatives Bowen has been involved with include the Nanci Bowen Charity golf event benefitting Hospice, Oncology services and transitional care in Tift County; and a volunteer golf instructor for kids with Autism in 2010 and 2011. She served as athletic director at Wesleyan College in Macon, Ga., from 2007-2009.

Bowen currently resides in Travelers Rest, S.C.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

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Inducted

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Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Tickets Now on Sale
Inducted

The GSGA is excited to announce the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame's Class of 2016! The Class of well-deserving individuals include (l-r) Nanci Bowen of Travelers Rest, S.C., Chris Haack of Bogart, Stewart Maiden (posthumous induction), James Mason of Dillard and Layne Williams of Marietta.
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Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Dan Nyimicz - Class of 1997 - Passes Away
Inducted

The Georgia Golf Hall of Fame is saddened to report the passing of Dan Nyimicz, GGHOF Class of 1997.
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Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Louise Suggs - Class of 1989 - Passes Away
Inducted

The Georgia Golf Hall of Fame is saddened to report the passing of Louise Suggs, GGHOF Class of 1989.
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Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Induction Photos and Videos
Inducted

Take a trip down memory lane! View photos and videos from previous Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Induction Ceremonies:

GGHOF members: This archive is a work in progress.  If you have photos or videos from your induction year, please contact us.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

GGHOF Announces the Class of 2016!
Inducted

MARIETTA, Ga. – The Georgia State Golf Association is pleased to announce the 2016 inductees into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame:

Nanci Bowen of Travelers Rest, S.C., is a former Ladies Professional Golf Association touring player and is currently a teacher of the game of golf;

Christopher Jay (Chris) Haack of Bogart, Ga., is the Head Coach and Director of Golf at the University of Georgia and his leadership and dedication has built his program into a perennial power;

Stewart Maiden (posthumous induction) was well-known for his teaching and club building and has been recognized for his expertise of the golf swing;

James Mason of Dillard, Ga., has enjoyed a successful career as a professional golfer and has made significant contributions to the game;

C. Layne Williams of Marietta, Ga., is the longtime Senior Director of Rules and Competitions of the Georgia State Golf Association and his knowledge and passion of the Rules of Golf and experience as a golf administrator has made an impact on multiple levels.

The Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Induction Banquet and Ceremony will take place on Saturday, January 16, 2016, at the Atlanta Athletic Club in Johns Creek.

The Atlanta Athletic Club holds a long and storied place in the history of golf in the state of Georgia, as the home club of the greatest amateur golfer of them all, Bobby Jones, along with no less than 14 other members of the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame. The club hosted its third PGA Championship in 2011, and most recently hosted the U.S. Amateur Championship, its sixth USGA national championship, in 2014.

Chuck Palmer, chairman of the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Committee, said, "The Nominating Committee and Hall of Fame Committee, along with Kim Cox, director of the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame, thoroughly vetted the nominations for the Hall of Fame, and we are elated with the final selections for the 2016 class who will be inducted into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame. I appreciate all the committee members who contributed their time and efforts in selecting this terrific class."

Biographical information on the five inductees:

Nanci Bowen, Travelers Rest, S.C.
Nanci Bowen of Travelers Rest, S.C., is a former Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) touring player and is currently teaching golf in Greenville, S.C. As a seasoned golf professional, she brings valuable experience and wisdom to the students she teaches.

Born in Tifton, Ga., Bowen attended Tift County High School. As a junior golfer, she competed in Georgia State Golf Association competitions, winning four consecutive Georgia Girls' Championships along the way. Now in its 36th year, Bowen won the second Girls' Championship played in 1981 at Coosa Country Club in Rome, site of the 2015 event. She then added titles in 1982 (Country Club of Columbus), 1983 (Snapfinger Woods Country Club in Decatur) and 1984 (Houston Lake Country Club in Perry).

Bowen was awarded a full golf scholarship to the University of Georgia, where she was a two-time All-America selection. In 1987, Bowen earned individual runner-up honors at the Southeastern Conference (SEC) Championship, and in 1989, finished sixth at the NCAA Championship.

During her collegiate career as an amateur golfer, Bowen was a semifinalist at the 1987 U.S. Women's Amateur Championship played at Rhode Island Country Club in Barrington, Rhode Island. Also as an amateur, she qualified for and competed in five U.S. Women's Open Championships. She was the winner of the 1988 Trans-National Championship.

Bowen turned professional and joined the LPGA Tour in 1990. She captured her first professional victory at the Nabisco Dinah Shore in 1995, one of the LPGA's major championships, and she crossed the $1 million mark in career earnings in 2002. She was a member of the LPGA Tour Player Executive Committee from 1999 to 2001 and served as Vice President in 2001.

Past initiatives Bowen has been involved with include the Nanci Bowen Charity golf event benefitting Hospice, Oncology services and transitional care in Tift County; and a volunteer golf instructor for Kids with Autism (2010-11). She served as Athletic Director at Wesleyan College in Macon, Ga., (2007-09).

Bowen currently resides in Travelers Rest, S.C.

Christopher Jay (Chris) Haack, Bogart
Christopher Jay (Chris) Haack of Bogart, Ga., is the Head Coach and Director of Golf at the University of Georgia and his outstanding leadership and dedication has annually made his program a mainstay toward the top of the collegiate golf landscape. He becomes the first collegiate golf coach to be inducted into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame.

Born in Menasha, Wisconsin, Haack moved to Georgia and attended Newnan High School. He played golf at West Georgia College from 1978 to 1981, and earned his Bachelor of Arts degree from Mellen University in 1997. He began his career in golf with the American Junior Golf Association, and from 1980 to 1996, he held multiple positions including Tournament Director, Director of Operations, Director of Development, Foundation Director and Assistant Executive Director.

Haack was named head golf coach at the University of Georgia in 1996 and has taken the program to a new level of success. He has guided the Bulldogs to two national championships (the only two in school history), seven Southeastern Conference (SEC) titles and several team and individual records. His first Georgia squad in the 1996-1997 season showed glimpses of what was to come as he led the team to finish fourth or better in seven of 11 events and advanced to the regionals of the NCAA Championships. Haack's breakthrough year came in 1998-1999 when his Bulldog team ascended to a number one ranking in national polls, and later validated the ranking by winning the program's first national championship. Haack was named National Coach of the Year that year.

Under Haack, the Bulldogs have had eight top-10 and 14 top-20 finishes at the NCAAs, including the 1999 and 2005 national titles and runner-up honors in 2007 and 2011. He has developed 54 All-Americans during his tenure, including at least one in 16 of the past 17 seasons.

Haack is a two-time National Coach of the Year (1999, 2005), four-time SEC Coach of the Year (1998, 2000, 2006, 2010) and was inducted into the Golf Coaches Association of America Hall of Fame in 2012.

Haack, son Charlie and daughter Katie, currently reside in Bogart, Ga.

Stewert Maiden (posthumous induction)
Stewart Maiden was well-known for his teaching and club building and has been recognized for his expertise of the golf swing. Maiden was born in Angus (Carnoustie), Scotland, in 1886. Following his brothers, he came to the United States, specifically to be the Golf Professional at the East Lake facility, in 1908. He spent nearly 40 years in America, mostly in Georgia, prior to his death in 1948.

Among the golfing legends who Maiden taught include the great Bobby Jones, Alexa Stirling and Perry Adair.

Though his accomplishments and career in the golf industry began well over 100 years ago, his students and all the individuals he impacted will be embedded in Georgia golf history forever.

James Mason, Dillard
James Mason of Dillard, Ga., has enjoyed a successful career as a professional golfer and has made noteworthy contributions to the game.

Mason was born in Gwinnett County, Ga., and attended Duluth High School. He would then walk on to the Auburn University golf team, where he became a four-year letterman. In 1972, he won the Atlanta Amateur Championship (now the Atlanta Amateur Match Play Championship) held at Atlanta Athletic Club in Johns Creek, which began in 1919 as a stroke play competition for amateur golfers in the Atlanta area.

After his amateur career at Auburn University, Mason went to work at Sky Valley Country Club in Sky Valley, Ga., where he would hold positions of Owner, Manager and PGA Golf Professional from 1975 to 1991.

As a professional, Mason was a fixture in Georgia PGA competitions for a number of years. He won the Georgia Section PGA Team Championship (with Randy Brooks) in 1995. He earned Georgia PGA Player of the Year recognition in 1997, 1998 and 2000, and was Georgia PGA champion in 1997, 1999 and 2000. Also in 1997, Mason won the Polo Classic Golf Championship and qualified for and competed in the PGA Championship held at Winged Foot Country Club. He won the Atlanta Open in 2000.

As a senior golfer, Mason was the Georgia PGA senior champion in 2001. On the Champions Tour, he won the NFL Golf Classic in 2002. In total, Mason competed in nearly 200 Champions Tour events and has earned more than $3 million in career earnings.

Mason, wife Suzie and two sons, Steve and Chris, currently reside in Dillard, Ga.

C. Layne Williams, Marietta
C. Layne Williams of Marietta, Ga., is the longtime Senior Director of Rules and Competitions of the Georgia State Golf Association (GSGA) and his knowledge and passion of the rules of golf and experience as a golf administrator has made an impact on the state, national and international level.

Williams was born in Atlanta and attended Moultrie High School in Moultrie, Ga., where he played golf. He joined the golf team at LaGrange College in 1972 and was the number one player for three years. He has won the club championship at both Highland Country Club in LaGrange and Raintree Country Club in Charlotte, N.C.

Williams joined the Georgia State Golf Association in 1987 as Tournament Director, and quickly elevated to the position of Senior Director, where he continues to serve today. Having been a USGA Certified Rules Official since 1989, he has acted as Official in Charge at over 250 GSGA competitions and over 250 qualifying rounds for USGA national championships.

On the national level, Williams has served on the Rules Committee of close to 60 USGA Championships, including several U.S. Open Championships (14), U.S. Amateur Championships (20), U.S. Mid-Amateur Championships (18), and many others. He has conducted GSGA/Georgia PGA Rules of Golf Workshops every year since 1998, and has hosted more than 120 Rules of Golf Seminars at GSGA Member Clubs, including two seminars for the Bermuda PGA.

In addition to his unquestionable rules knowledge, Williams is an esteemed writer as he has published many articles for various publications, including Golf Georgia magazine and Through the Green magazine. He won the 2001 GAMMA Award for Best Essay for an article he submitted in Golf Georgia.

Williams and his wife, Teresa, currently reside in Marietta, Ga.

The Class of 2016 was selected by the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Committee and approved by the GSGA Executive Committee, based on the recommendation of the GGHOF Nominating Committee. These five inductees will bring the total number of Georgia Golf Hall of Fame members to 107.

The Georgia Golf Hall of Fame, which came under the management of the Georgia State Golf Association in 2010, is dedicated to the preservation and promotion of Georgia's golf traditions, heritage, achievements and excellence. For more information on the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame, please visit www.gghof.org.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Frank Eldridge - Class of 2014 - Passes Away
Inducted

The Georgia Golf Hall of Fame is saddened to report the passing of Frank Eldridge, GGHOF Class of 2014.
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Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Yates Inducted into Atlanta Sports HOF
Inducted

Charlie Yates of Atlanta, and member of the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame, has been inducted into the Atlanta Sports Hall of Fame for his lifelong career as an outstanding amateur golfer.
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Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

2015 Induction Ceremony Photo Gallery
Inducted


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Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

2015 Inductee Video Documentaries
Inducted

Produced by Mike Tank

Click the following links to view each inductees' video:

Ray Cutright

Ken Mangum

Gene McClure

Carter Mize

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Carter Mize
Inducted 2015

Carter Mize of Columbus, Ga., is a well-known, lifelong amateur golfer. He is one of the better players to come out of the state of Georgia, winning on nearly every level in amateur golf, and for that has been inducted into the Georgia Golf Hall Fame's Class of 2015.

A Columbus native, Mize attended Hardaway High School, winning multiple state championships and later went on to Auburn University, where he was a four-year letterman on the golf team. In 1982, he was individual champion at the Springhill Intercollegiate, and was his team's Player of the Year in 1983 when he recorded the lowest scoring average.

After his collegiate career, Mize returned to Georgia where he would go on to enjoy a successful amateur run. He is a two-time winner of the Georgia Amateur Championship (1993, 1994), and finished runner-up two additional times. Mize won the Georgia Four-Ball Championship four times (1991, 1995, 2003, 2004), all with playing partner Wright Waddell of Columbus, and earned runner-up honors three more times. He won the Southeastern Amateur Championship twice (1991, 2003). In 1977, Mize was low-medalist in the Georgia-South Carolina Junior Challenge Match.

On the national circuit, Mize qualified for the U.S. Amateur Championship in 1986 and 1990. In 1991, he qualified for and advanced to the round of 32 at the U.S. Mid-Amateur Championship. He was the Spirit of America champion in 1991 and 1993. At the Country Club of Columbus, where Mize has been a member since 1985, he has won the club championship five times (1977, 1990, 1993, 1994, 1999), and was the club's junior champion three times.

Mize and his wife, "J", have three children and love in Columbus.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Gene McClure
Inducted 2015

Gene McClure of Atlanta, Ga., is a lifelong contributor to the game of golf and has demonstrated an excellence in his knowledge, passion and volunteerism for the good of the game. He belongs to the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame's Class of 2015.

Born in Macon, Ga., McClure attended Lanier High School for Boys before studying law at Emory University, where he earned his Juris Doctorate in 1970 from the School of Law. Before earning his law degree, McClure joined the United States Air Force and served as Captain from 1963 to 1967. While enlisted, he was an Accounting and Finance Officer, responsible for all financial matters supporting the Strategic Air Command bomber refueling and missile defense bases. He also supervised base recreational and club facilities and competed in Strategic Air Command golf tournaments, conducted by the Air Force in the U.S. and Canada. He was awarded the U.S. Air Force Commendation Medal for Outstanding Achievement.

McClure's dedication to the game of golf is evident in his longstanding volunteer work both with the Georgia State Golf Association and the United States Golf Association. He served as President of the GSGA from 1996 to 1997, and is a past member of many committees, including the Executive Committee, Nominating Committee, Communications Committee and a past chairman of the Championship Committee. His work with the GSGA caught the attention of the USGA, where McClure first joined its Regional Affairs Committee in 1992 and has been involved with the national organization ever since. 

From 2008 to 2012, McClure served as a member of the USGA's Executive Committee, where his knowledge benefitted the GHIN, Mid-Amateur and Regional Affairs Committees. Over the past two decades, McClure has been a rules official at many USGA national championships and qualifiers, as well as many collegiate and state championships. As a USGA Rules of Golf Committee member, McClure has served as a rules official and referee at more than 100 USGA national championships. He was co-chairman of the 2005 U.S. Women's Amateur Championship when it was held at Ansley Golf Club in Roswell, Ga. McClure is an instructor in Rules of Golf for PGA-USGA Workshops.

McClure is a Trustee with the Jones Foundation at the Atlanta Athletic Club. He serves on the Executive Committee of the Atlanta History Center's permanent exhibit, "Down the Fairway with Bobby Jones," and was a historical consultant to its 2005 traveling exhibit and video, "Quest for the Grand Slam."

In 2008, McClure was the recipient of the Joe Dey Award, given by the USGA for his service to the world of golf as a volunteer.

A practicing lawyer in both Atlanta and Washington, D.C., McClure and his wife, Sharon, reside in Atlanta and have three children - Meredith, Holly and Devon.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Ken Mangum
Inducted 2015

Ken Mangum of Cumming, Ga., is the Director of Golf Courses and Grounds at Atlanta Athletic Club in Johns Creek, Ga., and is a leader in the turfgrass and golf course industries. He continues to serve as an ambassador for the game of golf in Georgia, nationally and internationally, and for that is part of the Class of 2015 of the Georgia Golf Hall
of Fame. 

Mangum was born in Anniston, Ala., and attended Alexandria High School and later Lake City Community College in Lake City, Fla., graduating in 1975 from the School of Golf Course Operations. Mangum moved to Georgia and served as Assistant Superintendent at Mystery Valley Golf Course in Atlanta from 1976 to 1978. He returned to his home state of Alabama in 1978, taking the role of Golf Course Superintendent at Lagoon Park in Montgomery.

Mangum then served as Golf Course Superintendent at Idle Hour Club in Macon, Ga., from 1981 to 1988. At Idle Hour Club, Mangum installed the first computerized irrigation system east of the Mississippi River, and established a golf course management program and hosted seven Peach Blossom Invitational tournaments. He designed and managed construction of a golf course operations center and implemented a master landscape program for the course.

In 1988, Mangum joined Atlanta Athletic Club in Johns Creek, Ga., where he currently serves as the Director of Golf Courses and Grounds. Under his leadership, Mangum prepared the course for the 1990 U.S. Women's Open Championship, the 2001 PGA Championship, the 2002 U.S. Junior Amateur Championship, the 2011 PGA Championship and the 2014 U.S. Amateur Championship. He was Project Manager for six major golf course renovations and designed and built the par 3 course in 1993. He also developed a management program that has produced many successful superintendents across the United States.

An active member of the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America, Mangum served on its Board of Directors from 1996 to 2001. He also served as President of its Georgia Chapter in 1987. He is a current member of the Rain Bird Irrigation Select Superintendent Advisory Board and sits on the USGA Green Section Committee. In 2004, Mangum was appointed by then-Georgia Governor Sonny Perdue to the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Board of Directors, where he served until 2009. He has served as an instructor at the John Deere/Bayer Green Start Academy since it began in 2006.

Mangum was inducted into the Georgia Golf Course Superintendents Association Hall of Fame in 2013, and was the recipient of the USGA's Ike Grainger Award and the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America Col. John Morley Distinguished Service Award that same year. He was named Georgia Superintendent of the Year in 2002 and the Georgia Turfgrass Professional of the Year in 1996.

Mangum and his wife, Pam, are parents of two daughters, one son and three grandchildren, and reside in Cumming, Ga. 

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Ray Cutright
Inducted 2015

Ray Cutright of Macon, Ga., is the Director of Golf at Idle Hour Club in Macon, and is a professional and dedicated teacher in golf. He has made outstanding contributions to the game, and for that was inducted into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame's Class of 2015.

Born in Syracuse, New York, Cutright attended Auburn University from 1969 to 1972, and after graduation, moved to Georgia and began his career first as an assistant golf professional at Brookfield Country Club in Roswell. After serving as an assistant for five years, Cutright took on the role of Head Golf Professional at Toccoa Golf Club in Toccoa, Ga. Less than one year later, he made the move to Macon, Ga., where he held dual roles as General Manager and Head Golf Professional at Riverside Country Club, where he stayed from 1976 to 1982.

After nearly six years in Macon, Cutright moved south to St. Simons Island, where he served as Head Golf Professional at St. Simons Island Golf Club for seven years. In 1990, he became Director of Golf at Sea Island Golf Club in Sea Island, Ga., then in 1993, he returned to Macon to his current role of Director of Golf at Idle Hour Club.

A longtime member of the PGA of America, Cutright served as Vice President before working his way up to President of the Georgia Section in 1996 and 1997, and Honorary President in 1998 and 1999. He served as a District 13 Director of the PGA of America from 2008 to 2010, and currently sits on its Junior Golf Committee.

Cutright is a Subject Matter Expert and is an original staff member of the Golf Professional Training Program, who has taught more than 50 workshops and seminars for the PGA, its Sections and Chapters since 1979.

Cutright has been recognized for his contributions to the game of golf with many distinctions and honors, including the 2014 PGA of America Professional of the Year. Other recognitions include the PGA Georgia Section's President's Award (2011), Bill Strausberg Award (2008), Horton Smith Award (1981, 1989, 2002, 2003), Merchandiser of the Year-Private (1999) and Professional of the Year (1992, 1997). He was inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame in 2009 and was National PING Club Fitter of the Year in 2005. 

Cutright owns his own business, Cutright Classic, and is a successful writer, inking a number of pieces for various golf industry outlets, including Golf Industry Magazine, Golfweek Magazine, Macon Telegraph, among others.

Currently a Georgia State Golf Association Foundation Trustee, Cutright lives in Macon, Ga., with his wife, Kris, and has five children - Lauren, Jeffrey, Gerral, Richard and McKinsey.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

2012 Inductee Video Documentaries
Inducted

Produced by Mike Tank

Click the following links to view each inductee's video:

Richard Crawford

Alfred "Tup" Holmes

Vicki Goetze-Ackerman

Gene Sauers

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

2013 Inductee Video Documentaries
Inducted

Produced by Mike Tank

Click on the following links to watch each inductee's video:

Laura Coble

John B. "Sonny" Ellis

Lowell Fritz

A.J. "Duck" Swann

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

2011 Induction Ceremony Photo Gallery
Inducted

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2011_hof_gallery

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

2012 Induction Ceremony Photo Gallery
Inducted

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

2013 Induction Ceremony Photo Gallery
Inducted

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

2011 Inductee Video Documentaries
Inducted

Produced by Mike Tank

Click the following links to view each inductee's video:

Mark Esoda

Peter Persons

Jim Stuart

Billie Wickliffe

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

William H. Zimmerman
Inducted 1996

William H. (Bill) Zimmerman was born in Augusta, Ga., on November 23, 1915.  In 1930, he won the first of his five Augusta City Championships.  When he was 19 years old, he won the 1935 Georgia Amateur.  In 1972 and ‘73, Zimmerman won the International Seniors Championship at Gleneagles in Scotland, and was runner-up in 1974.  He was the first Georgian to ever win this tournament.  In 1980, at the age of 64, he won the U.S. Seniors Golf Association Tournament and again was the first Georgian to win this prestigious event.  He was a member of the board of governors at Augusta National Golf Club for 15 years, a member of the board of governors of both the American Seniors and the U.S. Senior Golf Association, and served a term as president of the GSGA (1956-57) and the Country Club of Columbus. 

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

P. Dan Yates, Jr.
Inducted 1996

P.  Dan Yates, Jr., father of Danny, is a native of Atlanta, Ga., and born in 1918.  He grew up on the golf course at East Lake Country Club, tagging along with his older brother, Charles, and the great Bobby Jones.  From 1938-41, Yates was a member of the Georgia Tech golf team, serving as captain for three years.  Some of his amateur golf victories include the 1939 Georgia Amateur, the Dogwood Invitational, the Atlanta City Championship, and the Durham, N.C. Invitational.  In 1946, he was runner-up in the Georgia Amateur, and in 1941 and ‘46, he was runner-up in the Southern Golf Association Four-Ball.  Yates continues to contribute to the world of golf through association.  He served as a director of both the Georgia State Golf Association and Georgia State Golf Foundation. Yates passed away on May 12, 2017.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Danny Yates
Inducted 1994

Danny Yates was born in Atlanta, Ga., on May 3, 1950.  He is the son of P. Dan Yates, Jr., and nephew of Charlie Yates, both Hall of Famers themselves.  He won the 1970 Spirit of America and played on the 1971 and ‘72 Georgia SEC Championship Teams.  In 1971, Yates made the cut at the U.S. Open.  He has won the Southern Amateur, the 1992 U.S. Mid-Amateur, and pocketed both the Georgia Amateur and Georgia Mid-Amateur titles three times each.  He was runner-up in the 1974 North-South and runner-up in the 1988 U.S. Amateur.  He was a member of the 1988 U.S. World Amateur team, the 1989 and ‘93 Walker Cup Teams, and captained the 1999 and 2001 Walker Cup Teams.  Because of his amateur accomplishments, he played in the 1989 and ‘93 Masters Tournaments.  Yates served as a director of the GSGA for seven years, as a director for the Atlanta Junior Golf Association for 10 years, and a member of the USGA Junior Golf Committee for 12 years. He currently serves on the USGA Green Section Committee.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Charles Yates
Inducted 1989

Charlie Yates was born in Atlanta, Ga., on September 9, 1913.  Boys High School of Atlanta, once the home of the South’s finest athletic talent, probably never produced a finer golfer than Yates.  During the 1930s, few golfing amateurs in the country were better known or more widely celebrated.  Yates won the Georgia Amateur in 1931 and ‘32.  In 1934, he won the NCAA individual title.  The following year, he won the Western Amateur.  This Georgia Tech star became an international name in golf in 1938 when he won the coveted British Amateur.  In 1936 and ‘38, he played on the U.S. Walker Cup team.  In 1953, he served as captain of the Walker Cup team, and was named honorary captain in 1985.  Five times in his competitive career, Yates, secretary of the Augusta National Golf Club, was the low scoring amateur in the Masters Tournament.  In 1980, Yates was presented with the Bob Jones Award by the United States Golf Association.  He was inducted into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame on January 14, 1989, and inducted into the Atlanta Sports Hall of Fame on February 6, 2015. Yates passed away October 17, 2005, at the age of 92.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Gregg Wolff
Inducted 1999

Gregg Wolff was born in Philadelphia, Pa., on January 6, 1953.  While attending Georgia Southern, Gregg was a member of the nationally ranked men’s golf team and received the NCAA Independent All-American honor in 1976.  In 1978, he won his first professional golf tournament, the Mary Calder Invitational in Savannah.  He went on to win this tournament six more times.  Wolff joins fellow Hall of Fame member Dewitt Weaver Jr., in being the only players to have captured all four of the Georgia PGA major championships: the 1984, 2003 Match Play; 1990 Atlanta Open; the 1991 Georgia  Open; and the 1985, ‘87 and ‘88 Georgia PGA Championship.  As a senior, Wolff qualified for the 2004 U.S.  Senior Open, won the 2005 Georgia PGA Senior Club Professional Championship.  Other professional highlights include winning the Georgia PGA Player of the Year award an unprecedented seven times, receiving the 1996 Georgia PGA Junior Golf Leader Award, and being honored as the Georgia Professional of the Year in 1998.  In 2001, the Georgia PGA established an award in his honor, the Gregg Wolff Award, which will forever be awarded to the Georgia PGA member having the lowest stroke average each season.  Wolff has been head golf professional at Willow Lake Golf Club in Metter since 1981.   

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Billie Wickliffe
Inducted 2011

Billie Wickliffe was an outstanding golfer and a great contributor to the game in Georgia, a leader who had a long-range positive impact on women’s golf in our state, and for these virtues she is named to the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame.

The Georgia Women’s Golf Association record book shows that Wickliffe won its “official” state championship three times, in 1966 and 1967 at Match Play and 1971 at stroke play. She also won a second tournament that was conducted during many of those years, a “medal play” tournament in 1964 and 1970, and while those where not considered the official “championship,” the fields were reportedly just as strong and the players were trying just as hard to win. So, she won a statewide competition among the best women golfers in the state five times.

But while her golf was among the best in her day, she was clearly instrumental in taking the GWGA to newer and more fertile ground and gave up her championship play to do so. From 1976 to 1987, she led an organized effort that would form a new organization, GALGA, that allowed all women golfers to play in a statewide competition. Upon the GWGA’s change of membership criteria, she encouraged GALGA to disband since all players could then play in GWGA events.

Wickliffe was a past president of both GWGA and GALGA at different times. She also served as a course rater for the Northeast section for the GSGA. In 1994, GWGA accorded her its highest honor, honorary life membership, and posthumously renamed the Medalist Trophy, given during its championship to the player with the lowest qualifying score after 36 holes, as the Billie Wickliffe Memorial Trophy. 

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

DeWitt Weaver, Jr.
Inducted 1998

DeWitt Thompson Weaver, Jr., was born in Danville, Ky., on September 14, 1939.  In high school and college at Southern Methodist University, Weaver excelled in a number of sports.  He moved to Georgia after college and since 1965 has been a dominant force in the state, winning a record seven Georgia PGA Championships, a record four Georgia Opens and the Georgia PGA Match Play Championship.  While competing on the PGA TOUR from 1967-76, he won the 1971 PGA Match Play Championship and the 1972 Southern Open. Weaver was the longest driver on the TOUR in 1969.  His Champions Tour career was highlighted by the 1991 Bank One Championship.  He was inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame in 2003 and the Northeast Georgia Sports Hall of Fame in 2004.  He believes strongly in the scripture verse, Ps. 37:4, marked on his ball for identification.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Fielding Wallace
Inducted 1992

American golf lost one of its best friends when Fielding Wallace of Augusta, Ga., died in 1954.  For more than 50 years, Wallace had been a leader in the game.  He was involved in the organization of the GSGA in 1924 and served as its president from 1936-45.  He also served as president of the USGA in 1948-49.  Wallace was a founding member of Augusta National Golf Club and served as secretary until his death.  He was also president of Augusta Country Club from 1921-35.  Wallace was a gentleman who exemplified the old maxim that “the first quality of a gentleman is gentleness.”

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

A.J. “Duck” Swann
Inducted 2013

Albert J. “Duck” Swann’s golf career spanned from his college days at Georgia Tech to an international senior championship in his later years, and he was a dedicated servant of the game of golf and of charitable causes in his community. The Georgia Golf Hall of Fame is proud to include him posthumously in the Class of 2013 with his family and many of his friends and colleagues to honor his induction.

Duck Swann was a major influence on the lives of many in the Macon community and at Idle Hour Club. Peter Persons, Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Class of 2011, recalls how Swann would be one of his first calls when he returned home from a PGA TOUR event and repaired clubs for him at his home workshop. “He’d console me and inspire me,” said Persons. “He was one of my best friends, though he was of my father’s generation.”

Swann became acquainted with Roger Kaiser, the legendary Georgia Tech basketball All-American player and national championship coach at West Georgia and Life College, not through golf or a “Tech connection,” but at a chance meeting at a sports camp. “Duck brought a busload of youngsters up from Macon to my sports camp in north Georgia,” said Kaiser. “I didn’t know who he was then, but over time our families became very close friends.”

A Maconite throughout his life, Swann played on the Lanier High golf team and won the 1941 Macon City and 1942 Georgia Interscholastic titles. Following World War II years as an Air Force pilot, he was the Southeastern Conference champion in 1948 at Georgia Tech and was captain of the Yellow Jackets’ 1949 SEC title team.

He spent two more combat flying years in Korea before settling into several businesses in the Macon area. In 1958 he was elected to Georgia Tech’s “all time” golf team and into the Georgia Tech Athletic Hall of Fame in 1964.

Swann’s golf career blossomed again upon the time he turned senior amateur age of 55 in 1980. The year 1983 was his biggest. His most significant victory came at Walton Heath in England, as he became the first American to capture the British Senior Open Amateur. Also during the year, he won the Georgia Seniors title and qualified for the match play portion of the USGA Senior Amateur Championship.

The following year, he won the Legendary Senior Amateur in Birmingham, and was runner-up at the American and Georgia seniors. In 1987, he won the Western Seniors.

Swann was a member of several golf organizations throughout his life, including the Peach Blossom Classic, American Senior Golf Association, state Walter Hagen cancer tournament committee, Middle Georgia Golf Championship Board and was a past president of Idle Hour Club.

He also spent many hours volunteering his time for civic and charitable causes in the Macon and central Georgia area. He was a chairman or president of the Bibb County Department of Family and Children Services, Macon Rotary Club, Lanier Booster Club, Middle Georgia Area Georgia Tech Club, Tech-Georgia Development Fund, Vine-Ingle Little League and Macon YMCA.

Swann passed away in 2007 at the age of 81. He is survived by his wife, Martha, sons Albert III and Brad, daughter Kate Swann Ivey, seven grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Louise Suggs
Inducted 1989

Louise Suggs was born in Atlanta, Ga., on September 7, 1923. During her brilliant amateur career, she won the Georgia Women’s Amateur Championship twice, the Southern Amateur twice, the North-South Championship three times, the Western Amateur twice, the Western Open twice, the 1946 Titleholders, and the 1948 British Open.  She was also a member of the Curtis Cup team in 1948. 

After turning professional in 1948, Suggs became a founding member of the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA).  As a pro she won the Western Open again in 1948 and ‘53, and repeated her Titleholders win in 1954, ‘56 and ‘59.  Suggs won the U.S. Women’s Open in 1949 and ‘52, and was earned entry into the LPGA Hall of Fame.  She won the LPGA Championship in 1957. 

During her professional career, she won 50 LPGA events and served as president of the LPGA in 1956-57.  The USGA honored Suggs in 2007 with the Association’s Bob Jones Award.  The LPGA has named its Rookie of the Year Award after her. Suggs passed away in August of 2015.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Eileen Stulb
Inducted 2004

Eileen Stulb was born June 23, 1923, in Augusta, Ga.  Stulb was the first female to earn a spot on the Augusta College golf team.  She was runner-up in the Titleholders Championship twice, considered for many years to be the equivalent of the men’s Masters Tournament.  In the Women’s Western Amateur, she was a quarterfinalist on two occasions.  Stulb won the Georgia Women’s Amateur twice.  She played in the U.S. Women’s Amateur seven times, the U.S. Women’s Open and the USGA Senior Women's Amateur.  Stulb served on the Board of Directors for the Georgia Women’s Golf Association, the Women’s Eastern Association, the Titleholders Association, the USGA Senior Women’s Committee and was the local chairwoman for the 1971 U.S. Girls’ Junior Championship held at the Augusta Country Club.  Stulb passed away on February 26, 2007, at the age of 83. 

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Jim Stuart
Inducted 2011

Jim Stuart compiled one of the most enviable of championship title collections in mid-amateur, college and junior competitions and it is these accomplishments that have earned him a place in the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame.

None are more notable than consecutive U.S. Mid-Amateur championships, in 1990 at Troon Golf Club in Scottsdale, Arizona and in 1991 at Long Cove Club in Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. Stuart is part of a select club of Georgians, including Bobby Jones, Alexa Stirling Fraser, Allen Doyle and Hollis Stacy, who have won consecutive USGA national championship titles.

Those two victories earned him invitations to participate in the following years’ Masters Tournaments. He missed the 36-hole cut both years but scored even-par 72 in the second round of the 1991 tournament, second low of the day among amateurs. 

Before coming to Georgia to go to college, he had an outstanding junior record in Minnesota, winning the state’s PGA Junior title three times and playing in the Junior Orange Bowl International, the first PGA National Junior and twice played in the Junior World in San Diego, finishing sixth in 1977.

During two years at junior college power Alexander City (now Central Alabama), he earned All-American honors and won the 1978 national junior college individual title and was third in 1979. Stuart then came to Georgia to Columbus College (now Columbus State University), where he was part of the NCAA Division II national championship team in 1980 and was named a Division II All-American.

His string of tournament wins in GSGA state events began at about the same time as his national victories. He led his River North Golf Club (now Healy Point) to the GSGA State Team title in 1991, teamed with Bill Roberts to win the 1992 Four-Ball championship, was runner-up in the 1994 Georgia Amateur to Carter Mize and won the 1995 Georgia Mid-Amateur championship.

Stuart was also named the GSGA Player of the Year in 1994 and played on four Southeastern Challenge Cup teams and four Billy Peters Cup Match teams. He has also won several other events around the state, including the 1998 Peach Blossom invitational in his home town of Macon and the City of Macon championship six times. 

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Hollis Stacy
Inducted 1991

Born in Savannah, Ga., on March 16, 1954, Hollis Stacy set impressive records that still stand today.  In 1969, at the age of 15, she became the youngest player to win the U.S. Girls’ Junior Championship.  She is also one of only two players to win that title three times.  She won the 1970 North-South Amateur and was a member of the 1972 Curtis Cup Team.  Stacy joined the LPGA Tour in 1974, and her 17 victories include three U.S.  Women’s Opens.  Stacy posted back-to-back wins in the 1977 and ‘78 U.S. Women’s Opens, the 1981 and ‘82 West Virginia Classic, and the 1982 and ‘83 S&H Golf Classic.  After recuperating from a serious car accident mid-season in 1988, Stacy returned to score four top-five finishes and continued playing professional golf into the early 2000s, scoring a win on the Women’s Senior Golf Tour in 2001. In 2012, she was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Johnny Skeadas
Inducted 2003

A native of Savannah, Ga., Johnny Skeadas did not play golf until he was 21 years old.  As a teenager, he excelled at another sport: rifle marksmanship.  Beginning at the age of 13, he won numerous shooting medals, captained the University of Georgia rifle team and tied a world record.  He was inducted into the National Rifle Association Hall of Fame and his 1973 induction into the Savannah Athletic Hall of Fame was based not on golf, but on his achievements as one of the country’s finest marksmen.  In 1952, he brought this extraordinary hand-eye coordination to golf, thus beginning another story of excellence in sports.  In 1959, Skeadas won the first of six Savannah City Amateur Golf Championships.  In the years to come, Skeadas distinguished himself as a top senior golfer by winning the Georgia Senior Championship twice, reaching the final 16 in the 1988 USGA Senior Amateur and finishing in the top 10 in the 1990 British Senior Amateur.  He was named GSGA Senior Player of the Year three times.  He passed away in 1996 at the age of 64.  In 1998, the GSGA named the Senior Championship trophy in Skeadas’ honor.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Tim Simpson
Inducted 2006

Born May 6, 1956, in Atlanta, Ga., Tim Simpson attended high school at Woodward Academy where he was the Atlanta Junior Champion, Georgia Junior Champion and Westlake National Junior Champion.  He then went to the University of Georgia on a full scholarship, collecting several tournament titles and conference and national honors in his first two years.  After turning professional at age 20, Simpson was one of the youngest players to earn his tour card at 21 years and 2 months of age. Simpson’s first professional win was the 1982 Cacheral World Championship.  In 1985, he was bestowed with a PGA Tour Achievement Award and was the Southern Open Champion.  He captured the New Orleans Championship, the Walt Disney Classic Championship and earned the PGA TOUR’s Comeback Player of the Year Award in 1989, when he also became the fourth player in history to earn over $1 million in worldwide earnings.  In addition, he set the lowest 54-hole total in PGA TOUR history at 23-under-par.  Again in 1990, he won the Walt Disney Championship, became the first player in U.S.  Open history to ever reach 9-under-par and was a member of the U.S.  Team in the Asahi Four Tour World Championship, all earning him the Georgia Professional Athlete of the Year award.  A three time Georgia Open Champion, Simpson has 66 top 10 finishes in his PGA TOUR career, although that career was derailed by severe medical problems.  After surviving many medical procedures, including brain surgery, he returned to competition on the Champions Tour in 2006, earning the PGA’s Comeback Player of the Year award that same year. 

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Gene Sauers
Inducted 2012

Gene Sauers was a successful junior and college golfer in Georgia who was a three-time winner on the PGA TOUR spanning parts of three decades.

Sauers was born in 1962 in Savannah and attended Benedictine and Johnson High Schools. As a junior, he was runner-up to Georgia Golf Hall of Famer Peter Persons in the 1980 Georgia Junior Championship and was a member of the Georgia team that included Persons, Davis Love III and Hugh Royer III in that year’s Georgia-South Carolina-Florida Junior Challenge Match.

Sauers went on to attend Alexander City (Ala.) Junior College for two years, where he finished third and fourth in the junior college national championships. He graduated from Georgia Southern University, where he won the TAAC conference title.

Sauers was the youngest person to earn a PGA TOUR card out of the 1984 Qualifying School and soon after won his first of three TOUR titles, the 1986 Bank of Boston Classic. He also won the 1989 Hawaiian Open and 2002 Air Canada Championship. After having the outright lead after 54 holes of the 1992 PGA Championship at Bellerive Country Club in St. Louis, he finished tied for second, three strokes back of Nick Price.

In 1988, Sauers became the first PGA TOUR player to win a Nationwide Tour event, the South Carolina Classic, following a victory on the PGA TOUR. He also won the unofficial 1990 Deposit Guaranty Classic and pocketed two other second-place finishes. Sauers posted seven seasons on the PGA TOUR in which he finished 42nd or better on the money list, but his 2002 victory earned him more money ($630,000) than in any single previous season.

Sauers, who still resides in Savannah, continues to play in some PGA TOUR and Nationwide events in preparation for the Champions Tour, for which he will be eligible in late August 2012.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Jack Sargent
Inducted 1992

Jack Sargent was a member of the PGA for 26 years, spent 12 years at Peachtree Golf Club, 10 years at Pensacola Country Club in Florida, and was beginning his seventh year at Atlanta Athletic Club at the time of his sudden death.   During those 26 years, Sargent became known as one of the world’s premier officials of the rules of golf.  He officiated at The Players Championship for 11 years and at the Ryder Cup three times.  Sargent was famous for sharing his extensive knowledge freely and often.  He became a sought-after speaker on rules at numerous golf programs, and served the PGA education department as an instructor at clinics, workshops and seminars for more than 12 years.  Sargent received the prestigious Horton Smith Award from two different sections, the Dixie PGA and Georgia PGA.  This award recognizes outstanding contributions in educational services to fellow golf professionals.  Sargent passed away in January 1985, while at a PGA educational program in Florida. 

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Harold Sargent
Inducted 1989

Harold Sargent was born in Bethesda, Md., on October 16, 1913, and moved to Atlanta in 1932.  He was handpicked by Bobby Jones to be head golf professional at the Atlanta Athletic Club’s East Lake facility in 1947, just as Jones had chosen his father, George, for the same job in 1932.  Sargent served at two Atlanta Athletic Club courses for a total of 32 years, 15 of which he served as his father’s assistant.  George and Harold Sargent are the only father-son tandem ever to hold the distinction of serving as president of the PGA of America, with the latter holding the office from 1958-60.  Harold Sargent’s efforts brought the Ryder Cup matches to East Lake for the first time in 1963.  As the national chairman of the Professional Golfers Teaching Committee from 1951-57, Sargent inaugurated the PGA’s teaching manual.  He was named Golf Professional of the Year by the Georgia PGA in 1972.  He was also the longest serving member of the rules committee for the Masters Tournament. 

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

George Sargent
Inducted 1995

George Sargent was born in Dorking, England, in 1882, He began his golf career at age 12 at Epsom Downs Golf Club.  When he was 17 years old, he signed on with the illustrious English golfer Harry Vardon, who recommended him to Sir Edgar Vincent.  Sir Vincent coached Sargent and helped him enter the 1900 British Open at age 19, where he placed fourth.  Sargent later traveled to Canada, where he served as a golf professional at Royal Ottawa Golf Club.  He placed second in the 1908 Canadian Open, won the 1909 U.S. Open, and won the 1912 Canadian Open.  Sargent became a member of the United States PGA at its inception in 1916, and served as its president for five years.  His most noted contribution to golf was the introduction of motion pictures to study the golf swing in 1930.  Sargent was the head golf professional at Ohio’s Scioto Country Club from 1912-24, at Minneapolis’ Interlachen Golf Club from 1924-28, and at the Chevy Chase Club from 1928-32.  In 1932, Bobby Jones brought him to East Lake Country Club, where he served as head golf professional for 15 years.  Sargent died on June 6, 1962.  George Sargent’s two sons, Harold and Jack, were also accomplished golfers and Georgia Golf Hall of Fame members.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Spencer Sappington
Inducted 2008

Spencer Sappington was born in Jefferson City, Mo., on February 26, 1943.  He graduated from Lincoln University, where he captained the golf team and was an NCAA Division II All-American in 1965.  After college and service in the Air National Guard, Sappington enjoyed a successful 33-year career with the American Express Company.  Since moving to Georgia, Sappington has won multiple state titles, including a record three-straight Georgia Senior Championships in 2003-05, a fourth in 2007 and a record fifth title in 2010.  He has also pocketed three Georgia Super Senior Championships (2008, '10 and '11). Sappington earned GSGA Senior Player of the Year honors in 2003, ‘04, ‘05, ‘07 and ‘10, and received the Tommy Barnes Award in 2004 as Overall Player of the Year.  Other notable victories include the 1994 Georgia PGA Senior Open, 1998 Georgia Match Play Championship and four Georgia Senior Four-Ball Championships with fellow Hall of Fame inductees Jerry Greenbaum (1998) and Bill Ploeger (2001, ‘02, ‘07). To date, he has won 18 GSGA statewide titles (a record-tying 16 championships and two tournaments) and qualified for 19 USGA events.  In 2001 and ‘03, Golf Digestranked him in the top 10 among senior amateurs, while Golfweek listed him in the top 10 in 2002 and ‘03.  He also had very successful tournament records in both Missouri and Arizona.  His contributions to the game include participating on the board of directors for the Jim Dawson Memorial Tournament and serving as a GSGA director, on various GSGA committees and as a rules official for GSGA competitions. Most recently, Sappington was inducted into the National Senior Amateur Golf Hall of Fame.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Hugh Royer, Jr. - Class of 1989 - Passes Away
Inducted

The Georgia Golf Hall of Fame is saddened to report the passing of Hugh Royer, Jr., GGHOF Class of 1989.
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Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Doug Sanders
Inducted 1989

Doug Sanders is regarded as one of the best professional golfers ever to play the game.  This Cedartown, Ga., native has amassed 21 victories on the PGA and Champions Tours.  Sanders’ golf credentials include five PGA TOUR wins in 1961.  He was a Ryder Cup team member in 1967.  Because he placed second at the 1959 PGA Championship, the 1961 U.S. Open, the 1966 British Open, the 1970 British Open and the 1987 U.S. Senior Open, he is often viewed as the perennial runner-up in major championships.  He has also made his mark in golf by sponsoring the Doug Sanders International Junior Championship for top-ranked juniors around the world.  He was instrumental in raising tens of thousands of dollars when the Georgia State Legislature passed a bill for a scholarship foundation that enabled underprivileged students to go to college.  Among his many honors, he has been inducted into the Sports Halls of Fame in Florida, Georgia and Texas.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Hugh Royer, Jr.
Inducted 1989

Hugh Royer, Jr., was born in Eastman, Ga., on August 19, 1936.  He moved to Columbus, where he was nurtured into a love of golf by Country Club of Columbus professionals Fred Haskins and Charlie Harper, as well as University of Georgia golf coach Howell Hollis.  His first win was the All-Southern Junior in 1949 at the age of 13.  In 1958, he won both the Georgia Amateur and the Southern Amateur.  Royer turned professional in 1959 and won both the St.  Charles Open and the Western Open on the PGA TOUR.  He served as head golf professional at Callaway Gardens from 1960-66.  He also spent time as head golf professional at Bull Creek Golf Club in Columbus.  Royer won the Georgia PGA Championship twice in addition to the Georgia Open and Georgia Senior Open.  Royer served as president of the Georgia PGA and was the Georgia Golf Professional of the Year in 1983. Royer passed away on September 12, 2014.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

William A. Roquemore
Inducted 1998

William A. “Bill” Roquemore was born in Macon, Ga., on December 21, 1923.  Roquemore parlayed a small seed-cleaning plant, known today as Patten Seed Company, into a turfgrass sod and seed business with worldwide sales.  Today, his sod farms cover over 15,000 acres, located primarily in Georgia and South Carolina.  Roquemore was also recognized as the mastermind behind the Canongate golf courses.  He saw the need for golf courses to offer people an affordable round of golf, and so, in 1965, he opened the Canongate Golf Club near Palmetto, Ga.  Roquemore has given hundreds of families in the Southeast the opportunity to play golf at a top-quality facility, while staying within a middle-class budget.  In 1995, the National Golf Foundation presented the Jack Nicklaus Golf Family of the Year Award to the Roquemore family for their contributions to the game of golf. Roquemore died in July 1997. 

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Clifford Roberts
Inducted 1992

Clifford Roberts was born in Iowa on March 6, 1894, and came to Augusta in the 1920s.  There he developed a friendship with Bobby Jones, and co-founded the Augusta National Golf Club.  Roberts was associated with the club over a period of almost 50 years, overseeing the inception and construction of the golf course.  He chaired the Club from 1931-76, and chaired the Masters Tournament from 1934-76.  During this time, he remained true to the fundamentals and the spirit of golf, insisting that the game be preserved as it was and as it remains.  Roberts fostered the development of Bobby Jones’ history through interviews, advice and the instructions of Jones himself.  In 1976, Roberts authored “The Story of the Augusta National Golf Club.”  He served on the PGA Advisory Committee from its 1943 inception until his death in 1977.  He was made an honorary member of the Golf Writers Association of America in 1976, and was forever enshrined in the World of Golf Hall of Fame in 1978.  He died on September 29, 1977 at the age of 83.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Bill Ploeger
Inducted 2001

William D. Ploeger was born in Brunswick, Ga.  A graduate of Georgia Tech, he captained the Yellow Jacket golf team and earned NCAA All-American honorable mention.  Following graduation, Ploeger began a long and impressive amateur career.  He has qualified for the U.S. Amateur five times and the U.S. Mid-Amateur four times.  As a senior player, he has won the Georgia Senior Four-Ball five times and the Florida International Four-Ball with fellow Hall of Famer Billy Key.  Ploeger has won the Golden Isles Invitational in Brunswick 11 times. Ploeger has also won the Georgia Senior Championship four times and captured the 1999 USGA Senior Amateur.  In 2000, he participated in both the U.S. Senior Open and the British Senior Open.  In 1999, Golf Digest ranked Ploeger the top senior player in the United States.  That same year, he also received the GSGA’s Tommy Barnes Award as the overall Player of the Year, an honor he repeated in 2002.  In 2001, he was the runner-up in the USGA Senior Amateur and in 2002, was ranked the No. 1 senior amateur in the U.S. by Golfweek.  Ploeger is a member of the Georgia Tech Sports Hall of Fame, the Senior Amateur Hall of Fame and the Chattahoochee Valley Sports Hall of Fame.  In 2011, Ploeger was inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Billy Peters
Inducted 1993

Billy Peters was born on July 17, 1929.  He began an impressive volunteer career at the Georgia State Golf Association in 1973, serving on many committees.  He has served on the GSGA Executive Committee, chairman of the Rules Committee, and has helped rate courses.  From 1980-82, Peters served as the GSGA president.  During his term, Peters acquired state qualifying events for the USGA and implemented the USGA-GHIN Handicap System in Georgia.  Peters has been recognized as a rules expert and has been invited by the USGA to serve as a rules official at the U.S.  Open and U.S.  Amateur.  While serving as the 1983 president of the Georgia Junior Golf Foundation, Peters founded the Junior Golf Academy.  He received a 1985 Service to Sports citation from the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame, and the GSGA President’s Service Award in 1975 and ‘93.  In 2006, the Georgia PGA honored Peters with their Distinguished Service Award.  Peters is an honorary vice president of the Georgia PGA and in 1996 was elected as a lifetime honorary member of the Georgia PGA.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Peter Persons
Inducted 2011

Peter Persons has been successful as a competitive golfer at every level of play, from junior to professional, and his accomplishments over that period of time earned him entry into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame.

Persons became the first player to win both the Georgia Junior Championship and the Georgia Amateur Championship. He was an All-Southeastern Conference and All-American player and captain of the University of Georgia golf team and was invited to play in the 1986 Masters Tournament following a runner-up finish in the 1985 U.S. Amateur. He subsequently had a successful run on the PGA TOUR, winning one title and having three exempt seasons on the TOUR.

Persons won the 1980 Georgia Junior by seven strokes at Houston Lake Country Club in Perry against a field that included fellow future tour players Davis Love III and Gene Sauers. His Georgia Amateur victory came in 1984 at Sheraton Savannah Resort (now Wilmington Island Club) in a sudden death playoff over Louis Brown, becoming the first to win the Amateur and Junior.

In his college career, he was part of Georgia’s SEC championship 1982-83 team and he finished fifth individually in the NCAA Championship. In the ‘83-84 season, he set a school competitive record round in relation to par with a 9-under 63. In ‘84-85, he won the SEC individual title, was fourth in the NCAA, was named first team All-SEC and second team All-American. In his senior year of ‘85-86, he was elected captain of the team, won two titles, finished third individually in the NCAA and was a first team All-SEC and All-American selection. His season scoring average of 70.97 was the lowest in school history up to that point and his career average of 71.79 shares the lowest with Eric Compton.

His 1985 runner-up finish to Sam Randolph in the U.S. Amateur at Montclair Golf Club in New Jersey was as significant for sportsmanship as the golf play. Randolph fell ill during the early stages of the match and the USGA allowed him a few minutes to recover. Persons was gracious in permitting his opponent the time to gather himself, and the match continued without further incident, with Randolph winning, 1 up.

In his Masters experience, Persons scored 153 and missed the cut but had the fourth lowest score of the 10 amateurs to participate that year.

As a member of the PGA TOUR, he won the 1990 Chattanooga Classic with a 20-under-par total of 260, the lowest 72-hole total of that year. He finished 56th in earnings that year and remained an exempt player on the TOUR for the following two seasons. 

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Johnny Paulk
Inducted 2009

Johnny Paulk was born in Valdosta, Ga., and attended Albany High School.  He has been the head golf professional at Jekyll Island Golf Club since 1968.  Paulk has taught and promoted golf to hundreds of thousands of golf enthusiasts in his more than 30 years on the coast.  He has been honored with numerous accolades, including the Governor’s Faithful Service Award, the President’s Award from the Georgia PGA, and three times the Public Merchandiser of the Year Award from the Georgia PGA.  He has been named Georgia PGA Eastern Chapter’s Golf Professional of the Year twice and is the recipient of Spalding’s Professional of the Year.  Johnny has served as an announcer at the Masters Tournament since 1979, and is responsible for the creation and success of the Georgia-Florida Golf Classic, which has been held every fall for over 30 years.

In 2011, Paulk was honored with the Calvin Lee Murray Award from the Georgia Athletic Coaches Association.  It is an award presented to a person with a strong commitment to promote, preserve and strengthen the Georgia Athletic Coaches Association with activities that foster positive influences on both coaches and athletes in Georgia.

 

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Janet Dobbins Olp
Inducted 2004

Janet Olp was born July 13, 1948, in Savannah, Ga.  In 1960, she won the Georgia Junior Girls’ Championship and at age 13, was the Georgia Women’s Amateur medalist.  Olp is best known for winning the Georgia Amateur Ladies Championship and the Georgia Women’s Amateur Championship six times.  Over the course of her career, she was the medalist in the Southern Women’s Championship, quarterfinalist in the Southern Women’s and Trans National.  Several times she placed in the top five of the Women’s Eastern and competed often in the U.S. Women’s Mid-Amateur.  She has won the Atlanta Women’s Championship, the Atlanta City Amateur, the GSGA Top 40 Tournament and has been the club champion at the Atlanta Country Club 10 times.  She has served on the board of the Georgia Women’s Golf Association, serving as its president in 1996.  She was also a Georgia State Golf Association director for nine years and a 20-year volunteer with the PGA TOUR’s Atlanta Classic, serving as director of Tournament Operations in 1995 and ‘96. 

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Dan Nyimicz
Inducted 1997

Born on November 21, 1924, in Rahway, N.J., Dan Nyimicz graduated from the University of North Carolina in 1950.  He moved to Macon, Ga., to coach basketball, golf and track at Mercer University.  In 1962, he accepted the position of head golf professional at Idle Hour Club in Macon.  While there, Nyimicz developed a junior program that produced several outstanding individuals.  These include fellow Hall of Famer Peter Persons, a finalist in the U.S. Amateur, and Jimmy Hodges, a teaching professional at Sea Island Golf Club and a member of the Golf Digest teaching team.  A founding member of the Georgia Junior Golf Foundation, Nyimicz has served as its treasurer, secretary, and president.  He has also been deeply involved in the Georgia PGA, rising to the office of president.  Written by PGA Master Professional Ray Cutright of Idle Hour Club, these words perfectly describe his predecessor:  “He claims nothing for himself.  The mark of a true gentleman and sportsman.  Always done with polish, class and the ability to remain low key.” Of all his accomplishments, Nyimicz is most proud of the junior golfers whose games and lives he has influenced. Nyimicz passed away in September of 2015.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Larry Nelson
Inducted 1990

Larry Nelson was born in Ft.  Payne, Ala., on September 10, 1947.  He did not begin playing golf until returning home from military service in Vietnam.  In 1970, he began working for Bert Seagraves, head golf professional at Pinetree Country Club in Kennesaw.  Less than four years later, Nelson qualified for the PGA TOUR.  Nelson won a total of 10 times on the TOUR, including three major championships: 1981 and ‘87 PGA Championships, and the 1983 U.S. Open.  He also won the 1980 and ‘88 Atlanta Classic tournaments.  Nelson was selected for three Ryder Cup Teams.  He served as a Player/Director of the PGA Policy Board for two separately elected terms.  On the Champions Tour since 1997, Nelson has won 19 times to date.  Internationally, he has won five times, including the 1999 Chrysler Senior Match Play Challenge.  Nelson was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame on October 30, 2006.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Frank X. Mulherin, Jr.
Inducted 1999

Frank X.  Mulherin, Jr. was born in Augusta, Ga., on March 20, 1915.  He was nicknamed by fellow golfers as “the Mule.” Mulherin’s career victories include two Georgia Amateur Championships -- one in 1937 and another in 1965.  That feat made him the oldest winner in Championship history (age 50), and the champion with the most years between victories (28).  He was also a runner-up in the Georgia Amateur three times.  In addition to an impressive amateur record, Mulherin was active in the local and state golf communities.  He was a member of the Augusta Country Club and Augusta National Golf Club and served on the GSGA Board of Directors.  Mulherin also supported the golf program at Augusta State University and was a founding member of the Augusta Golf Association, an organization committed to promoting junior golf.  Mulherin died on March 24, 1979, at the age of 64.  The 1980 Georgia Amateur at Augusta’s West Lake Country Club honored Mulherin by dedicating the tournament to his memory.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Larry Mize
Inducted 1991

Larry Mize, a native of Augusta, Ga., has been winning tournaments since his high school years at Augusta Prep and his college years at Georgia Tech.  Mize turned professional and joined the PGA TOUR in 1981 at age 22.  Six years later, he won the 1987 Masters when he holed an unforgettable 100-foot chip shot.  One of his most impressive wins, the 1987 Masters earned Mize top honors from sports media, including GOLF Magazine’s Shot of the Year, the Georgia Sports Writers Association’s Athlete of the Year, and ABC’s Wide World of Sports Athlete of the Week for April 18, 1987.  From 1986-90, Mize served as a player-director of the PGA TOUR Policy Board.  Mize has four PGA TOUR victories, four international victories, was a member of the 1987 Ryder Cup team and the 2000 Dunhill Cup team.  In 2010, Mize won his first Champions Tour event in Canada.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Steven Melnyk
Inducted 1992

Steve Melnyk was born in Brunswick, Ga., on February 26, 1947.  He won the 1965 Georgia Open at age 18.  He graduated from the University of Florida in 1969 with nine collegiate wins and All-American honors.  Melnyk won the U.S. Amateur, the British Amateur, the Eastern Amateur, and was a member of the 1969 and ‘71 Walker Cup teams.  In 1971, when he won the British Amateur title, he became one of an elite group of men to have won both the U.S.  Amateur and British Amateur crowns.  Melnyk joined the PGA TOUR in 1972 and competed for 10 years until a 1982 elbow injury prevented further professional competition.  In 1992, he joined ABC Sports as a co-host of golf broadcasts.  He has been inducted into the University of Florida Hall of Fame and the Florida Sports Hall of Fame.   

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Billy McWilliams
Inducted 1997

Billy McWilliams was born in Rome, Ga., in 1912, and certainly saw the game of golf evolve in his more than 60 years of participation as a successful amateur.  His remarkable talent carried him to win the Georgia Amateur in 1933 and ‘34.  Several times he qualified for the U.S. Amateur.  He kept up his high level of competitiveness, playing in the Georgia Amateur at the age of 78, and again at the age of 80.  Outside of golf, McWilliams had a distinguished career as a naval officer.  He served 22 years before retiring in 1964 with the rank of Commander.  After his retirement, McWilliams returned to Rome where he established a successful business, served as district governor of Rotary International, and served as president of many civic organizations.  His success in golf and his leadership in life earned him the respect of his community and peers.  McWilliams died in April 2003.  

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Palmer Maples, Jr.
Inducted 2002

Palmer Maples, Jr., was born in Rocky Mount, N.C., in 1932.  Although a native of North Carolina, he has spent the majority of his time contributing to golf in Georgia through his vast experience as an agronomist and golf course superintendent.  Maples studied turfgrass under fellow Hall of Famer Dr.  Glen Burton at the Tifton Experiment Station and completed a degree in Turf Culture from Abraham-Baldwin Agricultural College in 1953.  He went on to the University of Georgia to earn a B.S.  in Agronomy in 1958.  Maples has served as golf course superintendent at the Charlotte Country Club, The Standard Club and Summit Chase Country Club.  From 1967-69, he was the president of the Carolina Golf Course Superintendents Association.  He was Georgia’s Superintendent of the Year in 1971, and was elected president of the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America (GCSAA) in 1975.  Maples has been honored nationally with the GCSAA Distinguished Service Award (1999) and the United States Golf Association Green Section Award (2000).

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Hobart Manley, Jr.
Inducted 1991

Hobart Manley, Jr., was born in Savannah, Ga., on December 20, 1926.  After accumulating several high school team sports honors, he began a highly successful amateur golf career at the University of Georgia.  Starting in 1948, he played in six U.S.  Amateurs, three British Amateurs, two French Amateurs, and one Canadian Amateur.  Manley’s tournament titles include the 1951 North-South Amateur and the 1954 Southeastern PGA Open.  He teamed with Marlene Streit to win the 1953 and ‘63 National Mixed foursomes tournaments.  He was named Savannah’s Outstanding Athlete in 1950 and was inducted into the Savannah Athletic Hall of Fame in 1969. 

 

 

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Ceil Maclaurin
Inducted 1992

Ceil Maclaurin was born in Fitzgerald, Ga., on October 26, 1925.  She collected 75 tournament titles in her career, including the 1976 USGA Senior Women’s Championship.  As an amateur, she won 13 Georgia State Championships, seven North-South Senior Championships, the Women’s Southern Golf Association Championship, the 1977 Women’s Southern Senior Championship, and the Canadian Senior Championship.  Maclaurin won two Georgia Athletic Ladies Association Championships, and was runner-up four times in the USGA Senior Women’s Championship. She was also the low amateur in the 1963 LPGA Sea Island Invitational.  Maclaurin served on the boards of the Georgia Women’s Golf Association and the Women’s Eastern Golf Association.  Maclaurin was the first woman to be inducted into the Savannah Athletic Hall of Fame.  Maclaurin passed away on January 25, 2010, at the age of 84.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Jack Lumpkin
Inducted 2008

Jack Lumpkin was born in Macon, Ga., on June 20, 1935.  In 1951 and ‘53, he won the Georgia state high school Class A championship.  He went on to play four years at the University of Georgia from 1953-57 and was co-captain of the team in 1956 and ‘57.  In 1957, the team won the SEC Championship.  After graduation, Lumpkin played briefly on the PGA TOUR in 1958-59.  Over the course of his career, he played in the Jaycee National Junior Championship, participated in two NCAA Championships, the U.S. Amateur, three U.S. Opens, the PGA Championship, five National PGA Club Pro Championships and the U.S. Senior Open.  Lumpkin eventually became an assistant professional at Winged Foot.  He later became head professional at Echo Lake and Oak Hill Country Club, serving as host professional at the latter for the 1968 U.S. Open.  He served as president of the Western New York PGA from 1968-70, earning the section’s Professional of the Year award in 1970 and was Player of the Year in 1970 and ‘71.  From 1972-78, Lumpkin was head professional at Atlanta’s Cherokee Town and Country Club.  In 1979, he became a full-time member of the Golf Digest staff and continued as such for the next 22 years while based at Pinehurst, Elk River and Amelia Island.  Lumpkin came to Sea Island in 1989.  In 1995, he was named the PGA National Teacher of the Year and was selected among the top 50 golf teachers in America (No.  1 in Georgia) by Golf Digest. Since 2000 he has been annually ranked among the top 50.  In December 2000, the National Golf Foundation presented the Jack Nicklaus Golf Family of the Year Award to the Jack Lumpkin family.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Davis Love, III
Inducted 2001

Davis Love, III was born in Charlotte, N.C., on April 13, 1964.  He began his amateur career at the University of North Carolina, where he was a three-time All-American, winner of the 1984 North-South Amateur and winner of the ACC Championship.  After turning pro in 1985, Love earned his first PGA TOUR victory at the 1987 MCI Heritage Golf Classic, a feat he repeated in 1991, ‘92, ‘98 and 2003.  Love has been a member of six President’s Cup teams, six Ryder Cup teams, five World Cup teams and was a Ryder Cup assistant captain in 2010. In 1996, he won the World Cup individual title.  Love earned his first major at the 1997 PGA Championship.  To date, Love has won a total of 19 times on the PGA TOUR and owns two international victories.  In 1997, he was inducted into the University of North Carolina Order of Merit.  Also in 1997, Love’s book, “Every Shot I Take,” a tribute to his late father, was the recipient of the USGA International Book Award.  In June 1998, he was named honorary chairman of the PGA of America’s National Golf Day.  In 2008,. he received the PGA TOUR’s prestigious Payne Stewart Award. Love and his brother, Mark, have been involved in the golf course design business in recent years.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Davis Love, Jr.
Inducted 1991

Davis Love Jr., was born on September 19, 1935.  While at the University of Texas, he captained the golf team to the SWC Championship.  He won the Oilbelt Invitational, one of the largest tournaments at the time.  Love’s outstanding professional record includes participation in eight U.S. Opens, three PGA Championships, and two British Opens.  He played in the Masters twice, in 1955 as an amateur and professionally in 1965.  Love also won two Georgia PGA Championships.  One of the most well-known teaching professionals in the country, Love served as head golf professional at the Charlotte Country Club, and later at the Atlanta Country Club from 1965-77.  He joined the Golf Digest Schools in 1975, writing 35 major articles over the next 13 years.  He was featured in two instructional videos and co-authored “How to Feel a Real Golf Swing.”  He was also a member of the PGA Teaching School staff.  Love died in 1988 in a plane crash en route to a teaching seminar.  He was selected posthumously as the recipient of the Harvey Penick Teaching Award in 1999.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Lyn Lott
Inducted 2005

Lyn Lott was born April 9, 1950, in Douglas, Ga.  While at Coffee County High School, Lott twice won the Georgia state high school championship, the Georgia State Junior and the Southeastern Junior Amateur.  He also won the Georgia State Jaycees Championship and the Future Masters.  At age 17, Lott became the youngest person to win the Georgia Open.  In 1972, he won the Georgia Amateur.  While at the University of Georgia, he was on the only UGA team in school history to win four consecutive SEC Championships.  Lott competed on the PGA TOUR for 11 years, participating in three Masters.  He served on the PGA TOUR Advisory Board from 1978-1979.  After making 150 cuts in his career, he qualified for lifetime membership in the PGA TOUR.  Lott was inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame in 1998.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Nancy Lopez
Inducted 1998

Nancy Lopez was born in Torrance, Calif., in 1957.  At the age of 12, she won the New Mexico Women’s Amateur.  In the following years as an amateur, she won the U.S.  Girls’ Junior Championship twice, the Western Junior three times, the Mexican Amateur once, and was a member of the U.S.  Curtis Cup and World Amateur teams.  Lopez began her professional career in 1977.  The following year, she won nine tournaments – including a record-setting five in a row.  Including three LPGA Championships, she has won 48 official tournaments on the LPGA Tour.  Lopez has won nine LPGA Awards, including Rookie of the Year, Player of the Year four times, the Vare Trophy three times, and the William and Mousie Powell Award.  Other major honors include induction into the LPGA Hall of Fame, the World Golf Hall of Fame, the USGA Bob Jones Award, the William D.  Richardson Award from the GWAA, and the GCSAA Old Tom Morris Award.  She also served as captain for the U.S. Solheim Cup team in 2005. 

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Emory Lee
Inducted 2003

Emory Lee was born in Felton, Ga., on January 13, 1929.  After serving in the Marine Corps for eight years, Lee served as the head golf professional at Canongate I Golf Club for 32 years before his retirement in 1996.  Lee’s impressive golf wins include the 1955 All-Marine Championship, the Georgia Open, and the Georgia PGA Championship.  He also won the Georgia Senior Open twice.  In addition, Lee participated in the 1968 U.S.  Open.  Lee served as president of the Georgia PGA from 1977-79.  He was named Georgia PGA Golf Professional of the Year in 1973, and again in 1977.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

George Kozelnicky
Inducted 1992

George “Koz” Kozelnicky was born in Akron, Ohio, on November 22, 1918.  After he served in World War II, he graduated from the University of Georgia.  He became a member of its faculty in 1951, specializing in agronomy and plant pathology.  From 1961 until his retirement from the university in 1983, he researched and taught turfgrass management.  As a turfgrass instructor, Kozelnicky instituted a turfgrass disease laboratory held on North Georgia’s golf courses, the only one of its kind at the time.  He strived to acquaint all those he taught and with whom he worked of the actual game of golf, so that their future contributions would benefit the game.  In 1992, Kozelnicky received the Distinguished Service Award from the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America.  He served as executive secretary of the Georgia Golf Course Superintendents Association and as editor of “Georgia Turfgrass News” from 1971-92. Kozelnicky died August 17, 2005, at the age of 86.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Martha W. Kirouac
Inducted 2006

Born and raised in southern California, Kirouac began her competitive golf career with the Southern California Junior Golf Association.  Her competitive career includes championship victories in the 1967 Women’s Intercollegiate, 1970 U.S.  Women’s Amateur, 1970 Trans-Mississippi Women’s Amateur and Curtis Cup appearances in 1970 and ‘72.  She also won the Georgia Women’s Amateur in 1986 and the Women’s Southern Amateur in 1990. Currently the executive director of the Georgia State Golf Association, Kirouac was a GSGA volunteer prior to joining the staff in 1996.  She served as a volunteer member of the Board of Directors and was the first woman elected to the Executive Committee.  In 2004, Kirouac served as captain for the U.S. Curtis Cup team that was successful in its defense of the cup in the biennial match played at Formby Golf Club, Merseyside, England.  Kirouac lives in Norcross, is a member of the Atlanta Athletic Club and serves on the USGA Women’s Committee.  She is a member of the Atlanta Athletic Club’s Hall of Fame.  

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Dot Kirby
Inducted 1989

Mary Dorothy Kirby was born in West Point, Ga., on January 15, 1920.  She attended the Washington Seminary in Atlanta, learning to play golf under the tutelage of Howard “Pop” Beckett at the Capital City Club.  Kirby went on to become one of the most consistent women golfers in the country during the 1940s and ‘50s.  Her greatest golf achievement was winning the 1951 U.S.  Women’s Amateur.  In addition, she was a runner-up in that championship two other times.  Kirby was selected to the U.S. Curtis Cup team four times, and five times won the Georgia Women’s Amateur Championship.  She also claimed titles in the North-South Tournament and the Southern Amateur.  She passed away December 12, 2000, at the age of 80. 

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Jack B. Key, Jr.
Inducted 1997

Jack Key was born in Columbus, Ga., on November 11, 1927. Golf enthusiasts across the southeast have long known Key and his younger brother, Billy. The Key Cup --inter-club matches between six clubs in the Columbus, Fort Benning and Phenix City, Ala., area -- was named in honor of the Key brothers and their contributions to the sport.  Jack Key was captain of the Auburn University golf team for four years.  He won the Georgia Amateur twice, the Southeastern Amateur twice, the Gala Seniors Championship three times, and was a member of the Four-Man International Championship team.  In 1971, he co-founded the Fred Haskins Award.  He has been a member of the GSGA board of directors, and both a board member and golf chairman at Green Island Country Club and the Country Club of Columbus, where he served as president in 1965-66.  Key was also a co-founder and board member of Bull Creek Municipal Golf Course in Columbus. Key passed away in February of 2016.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Billy Key
Inducted 1995

James W. “Billy” Key was born in Columbus, Ga., in 1931.  His interest and success in golf began when he won the 1946, ‘47, and ‘48 Georgia State Junior Championships.  In 1947 and ‘48, he won the Southern Interscholastic Championships.  In 1948, he won the Georgia Interscholastic Championship.  In 1951, he won the Florida Intercollegiate Championship.  Key won the 1958 Western Amateur, the 1962 Southeastern Amateur, and the 1968 Georgia Amateur.  As a senior, he won the American Seniors Best-Ball Championship five times.  He won the Society of Seniors Best-Ball Championship in 1989.  In 1989 and ‘90, he won the Society of Seniors Individual Stroke Play Championship.  A member of the U.S.  Seniors International Team, Key was team captain in 1994 and ‘95.  In 1990, he was ranked the No. 2 senior golfer in the United States by Golf Digest.  He has been a director of the Southern Golf Association, serving as its president in 1978-79.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Stephen Keppler
Inducted 2014

A well-known golf professional and an accomplished member of the Georgia PGA section, Stephen Keppler, the PGA Director of Golf at Marietta Country Club, has been selected for induction into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame.

Born in London, England, Keppler represented his home country at all levels of amateur golf. He was a member of the 1983 Great Britain and Ireland Walker Cup team. He came to the United States to attend college, playing on the golf team at Florida State University. He was named an All-American during his time in Tallahassee.

Keppler became a PGA member in 1989 as an assistant golf professional at Dunwoody Country Club. He then served as head professional at Summit Chase Country Club in Snellville for eight years before becoming Director of Golf at Marietta Country Club in 2000.

During his time in Georgia, Keppler has compiled an impressive collection of Georgia PGA Section victories and honors. Starting with the 1988 Georgia PGA Assistants’ Championship, Keppler owns 15 tournament titles, including four Georgia PGA Championships (1990, ’94, ’96 and 2011), back-to-back Georgia Opens (1994, ’95), two Match Play Championships (1991, ’93) and the Georgia PGA Professional Championship in 1998. His accomplishments earned him the Georgia PGA Player of the Year award for four-straight years from 1993-96. Keppler also earned the Gregg Wolff Award in 2006 for low stroke average.

On the national scene, Keppler has played in four PGA Championships and 13 PGA Professional National Championships, with his best finish a tie for eighth in both 1996 and ’98. Keppler has played in 12 PGA TOUR events. His best showing, a tie for third at the 1995 BellSouth Classic at Atlanta Country Club, was the highest finish by a club professional in the history of the PGA TOUR.

“ ‘Keppy’ has been a mainstay in Georgia professional golf for the past three decades and still remains one of the top players within the Georgia Section,” said Michael Paull, Executive Director of the Georgia PGA. “Stephen is not only an accomplished player, but an outstanding PGA professional and always a true gentleman both on and off the golf course. He is a dedicated family man who puts them ahead of himself at all times. He has been and will continue to be a shining light in the annals of the Georgia PGA.”

Keppler and his wife, Karen, have two teenage children: daughter Jordan and son Jonathan.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

O.B. Keeler
Inducted 1996

Oscar Bane “Pop” Keeler was born on June 4, 1882, and spent most of his boyhood in Marietta, Ga.  He was one of those wonderful characters of old-time newspapering who have become all too scarce in present-day journalism.  He was a veteran Atlanta Journal sports staffer, covering more than 80 major golf tournaments of national and international importance.  He won national recognition and fame as a writer and authority on golf.  But, most importantly to the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame,  Keeler chronicled every tournament stroke ever played by the legendary Bobby Jones.  He saw Bobby Jones – just 14 years old – win his first big tournament, the Georgia Amateur in 1916.  Soon after, the two became close companions.  He traveled 150,000 miles with Jones and is the only man to witness all of Jones’ 13 major championship wins – most notably the grand slam victories of 1930.  A unique individual, he was one of the best-known and liked of all the newspapermen in the business.  Keeler passed away on October 15, 1950, at the age of 68.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Gunby Jordan
Inducted 1994

Gunby Jordan was born in Columbus, Ga., on November 2, 1915.  In 1961, he created the Green Island Hills residential community and Green Island Country Club, which later hosted more than 20 years of PGA Tournaments.  He organized the first PGA tournament to be held in Columbus, the 1970 Southern Open, and traveled the PGA TOUR regularly to attract the top names in golf to participate.  In 1987, he authored the humorous book, “Caddies.”  When it was announced that the City of Columbus would close its only par-3 golf course, Jordan personally leased the course and maintained it for the use of young golfers in what he called his “Senior for Kids” program.  This program utilizes the skills and knowledge of senior golfers while developing the skills and enriching the lives of Columbus’ golfing youth.  Jordan died on July 25, 1994.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Rosie Jones
Inducted 2006

Rosie Jones was born November 13, 1959.  Early in her amateur career, she won the New Mexico Junior Championship three consecutive years and in 1979 was the New Mexico State Champion.  In 1981, while in her fourth year of varsity golf at Ohio State University, she was honored as All-American.  Her first professional win was at the Rail Charity Classic in 1987.  The following year she captured the USX Golf Classic, Nestle World Championship and the Santa Barbara Open.  In 1990, she was on her first of seven U.S. Solheim Cup teams.  She won the Rochester International in 1991, the Pinewild Women’s Championship in 1995 and the LPGA Corning Classic in 1996 and ‘97.  Again in 1998, she won the Wegman’s Rochester International.  In 1999, she was the Firstar LPGA Classic Champion and won the Kathy Ireland Championship in 2001.  Her most recent win was 2003, when she captured the Asahi Ryokuken International Championship.  She experienced a very successful 2005 with eight top 10 finishes.  To date, Jones is 11th on the LPGA Career Money List and owns 13 LPGA wins.  She served as captain of the 2011 U.S. Solheim Cup team.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Bob Jones
Inducted 1989

Robert Tyre Jones, Jr.  was born in Atlanta, Ga., on March 17, 1902.  He graduated from Georgia Tech and Harvard University.  From 1923-30, he won 13 national golf titles: four U.S. Opens, five U.S. Amateurs, three British Opens and one British Amateur.  In 1930, at age 28, he scored the Grand Slam of Golf by winning the U.S. Amateur, the U.S. Open, the British Amateur and the British Open.  This master stylist’s grace and ability brought publicity and honor to his state and his nation.  He was made burgess of the town of St.  Andrews, Scotland, sharing this title with only one other American: Benjamin Franklin.  In 1933, Jones co-founded the Augusta National Golf Club, and established the prestigious Masters Tournament there in 1934.  He was golf’s greatest ambassador and is generally honored as its greatest competitor.  Jones died in 1971 at the age of 69.

Georgia Golf Hall of Fame Member

Suzanne Jackson
Inducted 2003

Suzanne Jackson could be called one of Georgia golf’s modern pioneers. She was first in line at a time when opportunities were just becoming available for young women golfers, and later she was instrumental in paving the way for women in professional golf administration. Born in 1952 in LaGrange, Ga., Jackson was the only girl playing on the boys’ golf team at LaGrange High from 1968-70. As a junior golfer, she advanced to the semifinals of the 1969 U.S. Girls’ Junior Championship and won the Burdeshaw Trophy as low junior medalist in the 1970 Georgia Women’s Amateur. She became the first woman to receive a golf scholarship to the University of Florida, where she won three college tournaments. In 1981, she was hired as a tournament official by the LPGA and continued up the ranks to become tournament director in 1985. She was named director of tournament operations in 1991. While overseeing the rules and regulations of the growing LPGA, Jackson’s reputation as a rules expert earned her invitations as one of the first women to serve as a rules official at the U.S. Open, the PGA Championship, and the Masters.  In addition, she represented the LPGA as a consulting member of the USGA Rules of Golf Committee. Jackson was honored with the LPGA’s Patty Berg Award for outstanding contributions to women’s golf and she is a member of the University of Florida Sports Hall of Fame and National Golf Coaches Association Hall of Fame. Jackson passed away in November 1998 at the age of 46 after a lengthy battle with breast cancer.